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Supported lipid bilayer microarrays created by non-contact printing


Kaufmann, S; Sobek, J; Textor, M; Reimhult, E (2011). Supported lipid bilayer microarrays created by non-contact printing. Lab on a Chip, 11(14):2403-2410.

Abstract

Arrays of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) provide great potential for future drug development and multiplexed biological research, but are difficult to prepare due to the sensitivity of both the lipid and protein structural arrangement to air exposure. A novel way to produce arrays of SLBs is presented based on non-contact dispensing of vesicles to a substrate through a thin surface confined water film. The approach presents many degrees of freedom since it is not limited to a specific substrate, lipid composition, linker or controlled environment. The method allows adjustment of spot size (180-360 μm) by repeated dispensing as well as control over the composition of the spots and subsequent analytes. SLB formation by vesicle adsorption and rupture allows for incorporation of membrane proteins through pre-formed proteoliposomes. Dispensing through a dip-and-rinse water film avoids contamination, disruptive drying and the need for complex buffer compositions. Furthermore, no humidity control is necessary which simplifies the production step and prolongs the life-time of the spotting system. We characterize the method with respect to control over spot size, bilayer mobility and the formation process as well as demonstrate the possibility to fuse bilayer spots with subsequently added vesicles. Since complex lipid compositions and multiple spotting nozzles can be used, this novel technique is expected to be a promising platform for future applications, e.g. patterning to monitor peptide/protein-lipid interactions, for glycomics using glycolipids or lipopolysaccharides, and to study mixing of spatially confined lipid membranes.

Abstract

Arrays of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) provide great potential for future drug development and multiplexed biological research, but are difficult to prepare due to the sensitivity of both the lipid and protein structural arrangement to air exposure. A novel way to produce arrays of SLBs is presented based on non-contact dispensing of vesicles to a substrate through a thin surface confined water film. The approach presents many degrees of freedom since it is not limited to a specific substrate, lipid composition, linker or controlled environment. The method allows adjustment of spot size (180-360 μm) by repeated dispensing as well as control over the composition of the spots and subsequent analytes. SLB formation by vesicle adsorption and rupture allows for incorporation of membrane proteins through pre-formed proteoliposomes. Dispensing through a dip-and-rinse water film avoids contamination, disruptive drying and the need for complex buffer compositions. Furthermore, no humidity control is necessary which simplifies the production step and prolongs the life-time of the spotting system. We characterize the method with respect to control over spot size, bilayer mobility and the formation process as well as demonstrate the possibility to fuse bilayer spots with subsequently added vesicles. Since complex lipid compositions and multiple spotting nozzles can be used, this novel technique is expected to be a promising platform for future applications, e.g. patterning to monitor peptide/protein-lipid interactions, for glycomics using glycolipids or lipopolysaccharides, and to study mixing of spatially confined lipid membranes.

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15 citations in Web of Science®
16 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Functional Genomics Center Zurich
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:28 Jan 2012 09:42
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:28
Publisher:Royal Society of Chemistry
ISSN:1473-0189
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1039/c1lc20073a
PubMed ID:21623437

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