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Sodium and water handling after gastric bypass surgery in a rat model


Bueter, M; Ashrafian, H; Frankel, A H; Tam, F W K; Unwin, R J; le Roux, C W (2011). Sodium and water handling after gastric bypass surgery in a rat model. Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, 7(1):68-73.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It was the aim to investigate the influence of gastric bypass on renal sodium and water handling. The relationship between sodium and water absorption along the gastrointestinal tract and their renal excretion is poorly understood. Beneficial effects on blood pressure have been seen after bariatric surgery before significant weight loss has occurred.
METHODS:

Male Wistar rats (348 ± 19 g) underwent either gastric bypass (n = 14) or sham operation (n = 7) and were given a low-sodium diet with deionized water ad libitum. Before and after surgery, the rats received an oral sodium load (1.5 mmol/kg) as hyperosmolar saline (616 mM), and were then placed in individual metabolic cages so the urine volume, sodium content, and water intake for 8 hours could be recorded. The urine sodium concentration was also measured.
RESULTS:

The rats that had undergone gastric bypass had a significantly lower body weight than the sham-operated controls throughout the follow-up period (346 ± 21 g versus 501.3 ± 8.0 g at day 60; P = .0004). An oral sodium load after gastric bypass led to an increase in water intake (.07 ± .01 mL/g versus .03 ± .01 mL/g; P = .023), urine output (.03 ± .01 mL/g versus .02 ± .002 mL/g; P = .027), and sodium excretion (65.99 ± 10.7 mol versus 31.71 ± 8.7 mol; P = .020). No change was seen in water intake, urine output, or sodium excretion after sham surgery.
CONCLUSION:

Urine output, water intake, and sodium excretion are all increased after gastric bypass surgery in rats given an oral sodium load compared with sham-operated controls. More rapid excretion, and less retention, of a dietary sodium load could be a part of the mechanism underlying the beneficial effect of bariatric surgery on blood pressure.

Copyright © 2011 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It was the aim to investigate the influence of gastric bypass on renal sodium and water handling. The relationship between sodium and water absorption along the gastrointestinal tract and their renal excretion is poorly understood. Beneficial effects on blood pressure have been seen after bariatric surgery before significant weight loss has occurred.
METHODS:

Male Wistar rats (348 ± 19 g) underwent either gastric bypass (n = 14) or sham operation (n = 7) and were given a low-sodium diet with deionized water ad libitum. Before and after surgery, the rats received an oral sodium load (1.5 mmol/kg) as hyperosmolar saline (616 mM), and were then placed in individual metabolic cages so the urine volume, sodium content, and water intake for 8 hours could be recorded. The urine sodium concentration was also measured.
RESULTS:

The rats that had undergone gastric bypass had a significantly lower body weight than the sham-operated controls throughout the follow-up period (346 ± 21 g versus 501.3 ± 8.0 g at day 60; P = .0004). An oral sodium load after gastric bypass led to an increase in water intake (.07 ± .01 mL/g versus .03 ± .01 mL/g; P = .023), urine output (.03 ± .01 mL/g versus .02 ± .002 mL/g; P = .027), and sodium excretion (65.99 ± 10.7 mol versus 31.71 ± 8.7 mol; P = .020). No change was seen in water intake, urine output, or sodium excretion after sham surgery.
CONCLUSION:

Urine output, water intake, and sodium excretion are all increased after gastric bypass surgery in rats given an oral sodium load compared with sham-operated controls. More rapid excretion, and less retention, of a dietary sodium load could be a part of the mechanism underlying the beneficial effect of bariatric surgery on blood pressure.

Copyright © 2011 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:02 Mar 2012 21:35
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:28
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1550-7289
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2010.03.286
PubMed ID:20570570

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