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Biodegradation, soft and hard tissue integration of various polyethylene glycol hydrogels: a histomorphometric study in rabbits


Thoma, D S; Subramani, K; Weber, Franz E; Luder, H U; Hämmerle, C H F; Jung, R E (2011). Biodegradation, soft and hard tissue integration of various polyethylene glycol hydrogels: a histomorphometric study in rabbits. Clinical Oral Implants Research, 22(11):1247-1254.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

(i) To evaluate biodegradation, hard and soft tissue integration using various polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels; (ii) to evaluate the influence of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) on two types of PEG hydrogels.
MATERIAL AND METHODS:

In seven rabbits, six treatment modalities were randomly applied subperiosteally on the skull: (1) a dense network PEG hydrogel (PEG1), (2) PEG1 modified with RGD (PEG1-RGD), (3) a looser network PEG hydrogel (PEG2), (4) PEG2 modified with RGD (PEG2-RGD), (5) a collagen membrane, and (6) a polylactide/polyglycolide/trimethylene carbonate membrane. The animals were sacrificed at 14 days. Histomorphometric analyses were performed on undecalcified Epon sections using a standardized region of interest. For statistical analysis, paired t-test and signed rank test were applied.
RESULTS:

PEG1 and PEG1-RGD remained intact and maintained the shape. PEG2 and PEG2-RGD completely degraded and were replaced by connective tissue and bone. The largest amount of mineralized tissue was found for PEG2-RGD (21.4%), followed by PEG 2 (9.5%). The highest percentage of residual hydrogel/membrane was observed for PEG1-RGD (55.6%), followed by PEG1 (26.7%).
CONCLUSIONS:

Modifications of the physico-chemical properties of PEG hydrogels and the addition of RGD influenced soft and hard tissue integration and biodegradation. PEG1 showed an increased degradation time and maintained the shape. The soft tissue integration was enhanced by adding an RGD sequence. A high turn-over rate and extensive bone regeneration was observed using PEG2. The addition of RGD further improved bone formation and soft tissue integration.

© 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

(i) To evaluate biodegradation, hard and soft tissue integration using various polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels; (ii) to evaluate the influence of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) on two types of PEG hydrogels.
MATERIAL AND METHODS:

In seven rabbits, six treatment modalities were randomly applied subperiosteally on the skull: (1) a dense network PEG hydrogel (PEG1), (2) PEG1 modified with RGD (PEG1-RGD), (3) a looser network PEG hydrogel (PEG2), (4) PEG2 modified with RGD (PEG2-RGD), (5) a collagen membrane, and (6) a polylactide/polyglycolide/trimethylene carbonate membrane. The animals were sacrificed at 14 days. Histomorphometric analyses were performed on undecalcified Epon sections using a standardized region of interest. For statistical analysis, paired t-test and signed rank test were applied.
RESULTS:

PEG1 and PEG1-RGD remained intact and maintained the shape. PEG2 and PEG2-RGD completely degraded and were replaced by connective tissue and bone. The largest amount of mineralized tissue was found for PEG2-RGD (21.4%), followed by PEG 2 (9.5%). The highest percentage of residual hydrogel/membrane was observed for PEG1-RGD (55.6%), followed by PEG1 (26.7%).
CONCLUSIONS:

Modifications of the physico-chemical properties of PEG hydrogels and the addition of RGD influenced soft and hard tissue integration and biodegradation. PEG1 showed an increased degradation time and maintained the shape. The soft tissue integration was enhanced by adding an RGD sequence. A high turn-over rate and extensive bone regeneration was observed using PEG2. The addition of RGD further improved bone formation and soft tissue integration.

© 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Institute of Oral Biology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:30 Jan 2012 07:45
Last Modified:17 Feb 2018 14:52
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0905-7161
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0501.2010.02075.x
PubMed ID:21518006

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