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Evidence for progenitor-derivative speciation in sexually deceptive orchids


Schlüter, P M; Ruas, P M; Kohl, G; Ruas, D F; Stuessy, T F; Paulus, H F (2011). Evidence for progenitor-derivative speciation in sexually deceptive orchids. Annals of Botany, 108(5):895-906.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Sexually deceptive orchids of the genus Ophrys use mimicry of pollinator females to attract specific pollinators. Pollinator shifts may drive speciation in Ophrys, since novel pollinators may in principle act as isolating factors immediately. It is thus possible that evolution of novel species occurs rapidly and with a progenitor-derivative pattern. The aims of this study are to compare genetic structure and diversity among widespread and geographically restricted Ophrys taxa, to test whether genetic structure is associated with specific pollinators, and to investigate whether any widespread species may have acted as a progenitor for the evolution of more restricted taxa.
METHODS:

Genetic differentiation and diversity were investigated in O. leucadica and O. cinereophila, the two taxa of the Ophrys fusca sensu lato complex widespread in the Aegean, and three geographically restricted taxa from Rhodes, O. attaviria, O. parvula and O. persephonae, all differing in their specific pollinators. This was done using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) DNA fingerprinting, and sequencing of the low-copy nuclear gene LEAFY (LFY).
KEY RESULTS:

All taxa were found to be separate genetic entities, with O. leucadica forming two geographic groups from the west and east of the Aegean. Genetic structure was significantly shaped by pollinators and geography, and comparison of sequence and AFLP data revealed ancestral polymorphisms shared among several taxa. Among the sampled taxa, O. leucadica harbours the greatest genetic differentiation and geographic structure, and the highest genetic diversity. Part of the genome of O. parvula, endemic to Rhodes, may be derived from O. leucadica.
CONCLUSIONS:

Pollinators probably influence the genetic structure of the investigated Ophrys species. The genetic pattern identified is consistent with O. leucadica being the oldest of the sampled taxa, making O. leucadica a candidate progenitor species from which more restricted taxa such as O. parvula may have evolved.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Sexually deceptive orchids of the genus Ophrys use mimicry of pollinator females to attract specific pollinators. Pollinator shifts may drive speciation in Ophrys, since novel pollinators may in principle act as isolating factors immediately. It is thus possible that evolution of novel species occurs rapidly and with a progenitor-derivative pattern. The aims of this study are to compare genetic structure and diversity among widespread and geographically restricted Ophrys taxa, to test whether genetic structure is associated with specific pollinators, and to investigate whether any widespread species may have acted as a progenitor for the evolution of more restricted taxa.
METHODS:

Genetic differentiation and diversity were investigated in O. leucadica and O. cinereophila, the two taxa of the Ophrys fusca sensu lato complex widespread in the Aegean, and three geographically restricted taxa from Rhodes, O. attaviria, O. parvula and O. persephonae, all differing in their specific pollinators. This was done using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) DNA fingerprinting, and sequencing of the low-copy nuclear gene LEAFY (LFY).
KEY RESULTS:

All taxa were found to be separate genetic entities, with O. leucadica forming two geographic groups from the west and east of the Aegean. Genetic structure was significantly shaped by pollinators and geography, and comparison of sequence and AFLP data revealed ancestral polymorphisms shared among several taxa. Among the sampled taxa, O. leucadica harbours the greatest genetic differentiation and geographic structure, and the highest genetic diversity. Part of the genome of O. parvula, endemic to Rhodes, may be derived from O. leucadica.
CONCLUSIONS:

Pollinators probably influence the genetic structure of the investigated Ophrys species. The genetic pattern identified is consistent with O. leucadica being the oldest of the sampled taxa, making O. leucadica a candidate progenitor species from which more restricted taxa such as O. parvula may have evolved.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Plant and Microbial Biology
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:06 Mar 2012 09:34
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 12:05
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0305-7364
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcr239
PubMed ID:21890487

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