Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

A questionnaire on treatment satisfaction and disease specific knowledge among patients with acute coronary syndrome II: Insights for patient education and quality improvement


Frick, Ulrich; Gutzwiller, Felix; Maggiorini, Marco; Christen, Stefan (2012). A questionnaire on treatment satisfaction and disease specific knowledge among patients with acute coronary syndrome II: Insights for patient education and quality improvement. Patient Education and Counseling, 86(3):366-371.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:
Secondary prevention for coronary heart disease is achieved by pharmaceutical control of risk factors and patients' own self management behaviour. To comply with longterm treatment patients need sufficient knowledge of their condition and should be satisfied with acute care. Therefore a questionnaire measuring both issues was constructed.
METHODS AND RESULTS:
Latent class analysis applied in a sample of over 2000 patients suffering from acute coronary syndrome revealed 4 configurative patterns of knowledge and 5 distinct patterns of (dis-)satisfaction. Nearly 50% of all patients displayed insufficient knowledge upon discharge. Deficits clustered around misinformation on necessary lifestyle changes versus dysfunctional strategies for future emergency situations. Satisfaction and disease specific knowledge were interrelated in complex patterns.
CONCLUSIONS:
Disease specific knowledge and satisfaction with treatment proved to be psychometrically valid indicators of the quality of the treatment process that might also have an impact on outcome.
PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:
A validated questionnaire is ready for routine administration after discharge of patients with acute coronary syndrome from acute hospital care. Patient education efforts and quality improvement in treatment centres might be effectively monitored using this questionnaire.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:
Secondary prevention for coronary heart disease is achieved by pharmaceutical control of risk factors and patients' own self management behaviour. To comply with longterm treatment patients need sufficient knowledge of their condition and should be satisfied with acute care. Therefore a questionnaire measuring both issues was constructed.
METHODS AND RESULTS:
Latent class analysis applied in a sample of over 2000 patients suffering from acute coronary syndrome revealed 4 configurative patterns of knowledge and 5 distinct patterns of (dis-)satisfaction. Nearly 50% of all patients displayed insufficient knowledge upon discharge. Deficits clustered around misinformation on necessary lifestyle changes versus dysfunctional strategies for future emergency situations. Satisfaction and disease specific knowledge were interrelated in complex patterns.
CONCLUSIONS:
Disease specific knowledge and satisfaction with treatment proved to be psychometrically valid indicators of the quality of the treatment process that might also have an impact on outcome.
PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:
A validated questionnaire is ready for routine administration after discharge of patients with acute coronary syndrome from acute hospital care. Patient education efforts and quality improvement in treatment centres might be effectively monitored using this questionnaire.

Statistics

Citations

2 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 10 Feb 2012
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Research Institute for Public Health and Addiction
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:10 Feb 2012 08:44
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:32
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0738-3991 (Print) 1873-5134 (Electronic)
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2011.06.004
PubMed ID:21719236

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF (Article in press) - Registered users only
Size: 350kB
View at publisher