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Adoptive transfer of T lymphocytes in immunodeficient mice influences epileptogenesis and neurodegeneration in a model of temporal lobe epilepsy


Deprez, F; Zattoni, M; Mura, M L; Frei, K; Fritschy, J M (2011). Adoptive transfer of T lymphocytes in immunodeficient mice influences epileptogenesis and neurodegeneration in a model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Neurobiology of Disease, 44(2):174-184.

Abstract

Intra-hippocampal injection of kainic acid (KA) in adult mice causes a focal lesion in the CA1 area and hilus of the dentate gyrus, as well as pronounced granule cell hypertrophy and dispersion. The lesion results in chronic focal seizures, with a two-week delay following KA-induced status epilepticus. Furthermore, seizures are preceded by infiltration of T lymphocytes into the lesioned tissue and of macrophage-like cells, strongly immunopositive for the monocyte marker F4/80, into the dentate gyrus, where they regulate granule cell dispersion and survival. Unexpectedly, depletion of CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T lymphocytes by targeted gene deletion results in a marked shortening of the delay prior to seizure onset, suggesting a role of adaptive immunity in epileptogenesis (Zattoni et al. 2011, J. Neurosci. 31, 4037). Here, we investigated the specific role of adaptive immunity in this TLE model by adoptive i.v. transfer of immunopurified T cells in mutant mice lacking either CD4(+) T cells (MHCII-knockout), CD8(+) T cells (β2-microglobulin-knockout), or both populations (RAG1-knockout mice). EEG analysis in mutants mice injected with KA two days after the T cell transfer revealed that grafting of the missing T cell population had no influence on seizure onset, but strongly influenced F4/80(+) macrophage-like cell infiltration in the dentate gyrus. Specifically, CD8(+) T cells in β2-microgloblin-knockout mice enhanced macrophage recruitment, whereas CD4(+) T cells transferred in MHCII-knockout and in RAG1-knockout mice blocked macrophage infiltration, leading to reduced granule cell dispersion and survival, thereby worsening the KA-induced lesion. These results suggest that intact adaptive immunity is required for delayed seizure onset in this mouse model of TLE and unravel complex interactions between T cells and mononuclear phagocytes for the control of neuronal integrity and survival in the lesioned brain.

Abstract

Intra-hippocampal injection of kainic acid (KA) in adult mice causes a focal lesion in the CA1 area and hilus of the dentate gyrus, as well as pronounced granule cell hypertrophy and dispersion. The lesion results in chronic focal seizures, with a two-week delay following KA-induced status epilepticus. Furthermore, seizures are preceded by infiltration of T lymphocytes into the lesioned tissue and of macrophage-like cells, strongly immunopositive for the monocyte marker F4/80, into the dentate gyrus, where they regulate granule cell dispersion and survival. Unexpectedly, depletion of CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T lymphocytes by targeted gene deletion results in a marked shortening of the delay prior to seizure onset, suggesting a role of adaptive immunity in epileptogenesis (Zattoni et al. 2011, J. Neurosci. 31, 4037). Here, we investigated the specific role of adaptive immunity in this TLE model by adoptive i.v. transfer of immunopurified T cells in mutant mice lacking either CD4(+) T cells (MHCII-knockout), CD8(+) T cells (β2-microglobulin-knockout), or both populations (RAG1-knockout mice). EEG analysis in mutants mice injected with KA two days after the T cell transfer revealed that grafting of the missing T cell population had no influence on seizure onset, but strongly influenced F4/80(+) macrophage-like cell infiltration in the dentate gyrus. Specifically, CD8(+) T cells in β2-microgloblin-knockout mice enhanced macrophage recruitment, whereas CD4(+) T cells transferred in MHCII-knockout and in RAG1-knockout mice blocked macrophage infiltration, leading to reduced granule cell dispersion and survival, thereby worsening the KA-induced lesion. These results suggest that intact adaptive immunity is required for delayed seizure onset in this mouse model of TLE and unravel complex interactions between T cells and mononuclear phagocytes for the control of neuronal integrity and survival in the lesioned brain.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:November 2011
Deposited On:02 Feb 2012 20:50
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:32
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0969-9961 (P) 1095-953X (E)
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nbd.2011.06.011
PubMed ID:21757006

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