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Influence of the crown-to-implant length ratio on the clinical performance of implants supporting single crown restorations: a cross-sectional retrospective 5-year investigation


Schneider, D; Wittmann, L; Hämmerle, C H F (2012). Influence of the crown-to-implant length ratio on the clinical performance of implants supporting single crown restorations: a cross-sectional retrospective 5-year investigation. Clinical Oral Implants Research, 23(2):169-174.

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the crown-to-implant length ratio (c/i ratio) on the implant survival, changes of the marginal bone level (MBL) and the occurrence of biological and technical complications. Material and methods: This cross-sectional retrospective study included all patients with implants in the posterior segments supporting single crown restorations with a minimum follow-up of 5 years. All patients were questioned and examined clinically and radiographically. The technical and biological c/i ratio and the MBL were measured on digitized periapical radiographs. The following outcome parameters in relation to the c/i ratio and the co-factors were statistically analyzed: implant survival rate, MBL, occurrence of technical and biological complications. For statistical analysis, regression, correlation and survival analyses were applied (P<0.05). Results: Seventy patients (mean age of 50.7 years [range 19.8-76.6 years]) with a total of 100 implants (24 Straumann type, 76 Brånemark type) were included in this study. The mean follow-up period was 6.2 years (range 4.73-11.7 years). Six implants failed during the follow-up period, yielding a cumulative survival rate of 95.8% at 5 years in function. The mean technical c/i ratio was 1.04 (±0.26, range 0.59-2.01). The mean biological c/i ratio was 1.48 (±0.42, range 0.82-3.24). No statistically significant influence of the technical and biological c/i ratio was found on the implant survival, MBL and occurrence of technical and biological complications. When adjusted for the biological c/i ratio, smoking was the only co-factor significantly associated with implant failure and biological complications. Conclusion: In the present study, the c/i ratio did not influence the clinical performance of implants supporting single crown restorations in the posterior segments of the jaw within the range tested. To cite this article: Schneider D, Witt L, Hämmerle CHF. Influence of the crown-to-implant length ratio on the clinical performance of implants supporting single crown restorations: a cross-sectional retrospective 5-year investigation. Clin. Oral Impl. Res. 23, 2012; 169-174. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0501.2011.02230.x.

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the crown-to-implant length ratio (c/i ratio) on the implant survival, changes of the marginal bone level (MBL) and the occurrence of biological and technical complications. Material and methods: This cross-sectional retrospective study included all patients with implants in the posterior segments supporting single crown restorations with a minimum follow-up of 5 years. All patients were questioned and examined clinically and radiographically. The technical and biological c/i ratio and the MBL were measured on digitized periapical radiographs. The following outcome parameters in relation to the c/i ratio and the co-factors were statistically analyzed: implant survival rate, MBL, occurrence of technical and biological complications. For statistical analysis, regression, correlation and survival analyses were applied (P<0.05). Results: Seventy patients (mean age of 50.7 years [range 19.8-76.6 years]) with a total of 100 implants (24 Straumann type, 76 Brånemark type) were included in this study. The mean follow-up period was 6.2 years (range 4.73-11.7 years). Six implants failed during the follow-up period, yielding a cumulative survival rate of 95.8% at 5 years in function. The mean technical c/i ratio was 1.04 (±0.26, range 0.59-2.01). The mean biological c/i ratio was 1.48 (±0.42, range 0.82-3.24). No statistically significant influence of the technical and biological c/i ratio was found on the implant survival, MBL and occurrence of technical and biological complications. When adjusted for the biological c/i ratio, smoking was the only co-factor significantly associated with implant failure and biological complications. Conclusion: In the present study, the c/i ratio did not influence the clinical performance of implants supporting single crown restorations in the posterior segments of the jaw within the range tested. To cite this article: Schneider D, Witt L, Hämmerle CHF. Influence of the crown-to-implant length ratio on the clinical performance of implants supporting single crown restorations: a cross-sectional retrospective 5-year investigation. Clin. Oral Impl. Res. 23, 2012; 169-174. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0501.2011.02230.x.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:22 Feb 2012 16:59
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:33
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0905-7161
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0501.2011.02230.x
PubMed ID:21689162

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