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Encapsulation of antigen in poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres protects from harmful effects of γ-irradiation as assessed in mice


Mohanan, D; Gander, B; Kündig, T M; Johansen, P (2012). Encapsulation of antigen in poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres protects from harmful effects of γ-irradiation as assessed in mice. European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics, 80(2):274-281.

Abstract

During the last two decades, synthetic polymers such as poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) have been investigated for the development of nano- or microparticles as adjuvants or antigen vehicles. To enable transfer of this technology to human settings, the issue of sterilisation is of central importance. Since most polymers are heat-sensitive, sterilisation of polymeric microspheres for parenteral administration is assured either by costly and laborious aseptical preparation or the more preferred γ-irradiation. Many studies have investigated the effect of γ-irradiation on various physiochemical properties of the microspheres, but investigations on immunological effects are rare. We prepared poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres containing ovalbumin (OVA) and tested the effect of γ-irradiation on the various immunological properties in mice. For reference, OVA was γ-irradiated and tested equivalently. The ability of encapsulated or non-encapsulated OVA to trigger activation of dendritic cells (DCs) was not affected by irradiation. However, while γ-irradiation of free OVA strongly influenced the antigen presentation, encapsulated OVA was not affected by irradiation. γ-Irradiation of OVA also reduced the immunogenicity in mice with regard to OVA-specific IgG1 production. In contrast, the antibody and the T-cell responses in mice immunised with PLGA-encapsulated OVA were similar irrespective of the γ-irradiation status. Hence, encapsulation of antigen into PLGA microspheres protects antigen from the potential detrimental effect of γ-irradiation leading to inactivation or altered immunogenicity. Sterilisation by γ-irradiation therefore enables a cost-effective production of PLGA-based antigen-delivery systems as compared to the more laborious and expensive aseptical production of such vaccines.

Abstract

During the last two decades, synthetic polymers such as poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) have been investigated for the development of nano- or microparticles as adjuvants or antigen vehicles. To enable transfer of this technology to human settings, the issue of sterilisation is of central importance. Since most polymers are heat-sensitive, sterilisation of polymeric microspheres for parenteral administration is assured either by costly and laborious aseptical preparation or the more preferred γ-irradiation. Many studies have investigated the effect of γ-irradiation on various physiochemical properties of the microspheres, but investigations on immunological effects are rare. We prepared poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres containing ovalbumin (OVA) and tested the effect of γ-irradiation on the various immunological properties in mice. For reference, OVA was γ-irradiated and tested equivalently. The ability of encapsulated or non-encapsulated OVA to trigger activation of dendritic cells (DCs) was not affected by irradiation. However, while γ-irradiation of free OVA strongly influenced the antigen presentation, encapsulated OVA was not affected by irradiation. γ-Irradiation of OVA also reduced the immunogenicity in mice with regard to OVA-specific IgG1 production. In contrast, the antibody and the T-cell responses in mice immunised with PLGA-encapsulated OVA were similar irrespective of the γ-irradiation status. Hence, encapsulation of antigen into PLGA microspheres protects antigen from the potential detrimental effect of γ-irradiation leading to inactivation or altered immunogenicity. Sterilisation by γ-irradiation therefore enables a cost-effective production of PLGA-based antigen-delivery systems as compared to the more laborious and expensive aseptical production of such vaccines.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:October 2012
Deposited On:11 Feb 2012 20:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:34
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0939-6411 (P) 1873-3441 (E)
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpb.2011.10.007
PubMed ID:22024408

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