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The natriuretic peptide system as a possible therapeutic target for stress-induced obesity


Mutschler, J; Kiefer, F (2011). The natriuretic peptide system as a possible therapeutic target for stress-induced obesity. Medical Hypotheses, 76(3):388-390.

Abstract

Genetic and environmental influences are both known to be causal factors in the development and maintenance of obesity. Stress related chronic stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and resulting increased glucocorticoid exposure are known to be important pathophysiological mechanisms in the development of obesity. Amongst many other factors involved, we hypothesize that the natriuretic peptide system, mediating endocrine and behavioral responses to stress, may also be involved in modulation of long-term body weight, and review the current available data supporting this hypothesis. Alterations in the natriuretic peptide system may not only constitute a genetic risk factor for alcohol drinking; moreover, recently the idea of an additional involvement of the natriuretic peptide system in the pathophysiology of stress-induced obesity emerged.

Abstract

Genetic and environmental influences are both known to be causal factors in the development and maintenance of obesity. Stress related chronic stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and resulting increased glucocorticoid exposure are known to be important pathophysiological mechanisms in the development of obesity. Amongst many other factors involved, we hypothesize that the natriuretic peptide system, mediating endocrine and behavioral responses to stress, may also be involved in modulation of long-term body weight, and review the current available data supporting this hypothesis. Alterations in the natriuretic peptide system may not only constitute a genetic risk factor for alcohol drinking; moreover, recently the idea of an additional involvement of the natriuretic peptide system in the pathophysiology of stress-induced obesity emerged.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical and Social Psychiatry Zurich West (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:09 Mar 2012 15:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:35
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0306-9877
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2010.10.049
PubMed ID:21106300

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