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Non-invasive investigation of gastrointestinal functions with magnetic resonance imaging: towards an "ideal" investigation of gastrointestinal function


Schwizer, W; Fox, M; Steingötter, A (2003). Non-invasive investigation of gastrointestinal functions with magnetic resonance imaging: towards an "ideal" investigation of gastrointestinal function. Gut, 52(Suppl4):iv34-iv39.

Abstract

Gastrointestinal (GI) function is complex and physiological measurements are subject to a variety of technical difficulties and practical limitations. The ideal technique would be non-invasive, widely available, convenient, and reliable and would not expose the subject to ionising radiation. It would permit direct assessment of GI function in the postprandial as well as the resting state, and be able to differentiate between food, secretion, and air in the lumen. GI structure and function are interdependent and the ideal technique would permit simultaneous assessment of these factors. Finally, the bowel operates as a functional whole and assessment of the GI tract proximal and distal to the area of interest is desirable. In this article the authors summarise the development and validation of magnetic resonance imaging techniques that overcome many of the deficiencies of existing methods, and have many characteristics of the "ideal" investigation of GI function.

Abstract

Gastrointestinal (GI) function is complex and physiological measurements are subject to a variety of technical difficulties and practical limitations. The ideal technique would be non-invasive, widely available, convenient, and reliable and would not expose the subject to ionising radiation. It would permit direct assessment of GI function in the postprandial as well as the resting state, and be able to differentiate between food, secretion, and air in the lumen. GI structure and function are interdependent and the ideal technique would permit simultaneous assessment of these factors. Finally, the bowel operates as a functional whole and assessment of the GI tract proximal and distal to the area of interest is desirable. In this article the authors summarise the development and validation of magnetic resonance imaging techniques that overcome many of the deficiencies of existing methods, and have many characteristics of the "ideal" investigation of GI function.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2003
Deposited On:19 Mar 2014 13:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:35
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:0017-5749
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1136/gut.52.suppl_4.iv34
PubMed ID:12746267

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