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The use of an acoustic device to identify the epidural space in cattle


Iff, I; Franz, S; Mosing, M; Lerchner, T; Moens, Y P S (2011). The use of an acoustic device to identify the epidural space in cattle. Veterinary Journal, 187(2):267-268.

Abstract

Twelve healthy cattle (weighing 188-835 kg) were placed in stocks and sedated with xylazine. Caudal epidural puncture was performed using an acoustic device that indicated a decrease in resistance with a change in pitch. Lidocaine was injected to verify correct needle placement by assessing needle prick stimuli applied on the left and right side of the tail root and the perineal region, and the loss of tail and anal sphincter tone. Pressure measurements were recorded during penetration of the different tissue layers and in the epidural space. A clear and sudden decrease in the pitch of the acoustic signal was audible in all 12 cattle. All cows showed clinical effects indicating successful epidural anaesthesia. The pressure in the epidural space after puncture was -19±10 mm Hg. The device may be of assistance in identifying the epidural space in cattle.

Abstract

Twelve healthy cattle (weighing 188-835 kg) were placed in stocks and sedated with xylazine. Caudal epidural puncture was performed using an acoustic device that indicated a decrease in resistance with a change in pitch. Lidocaine was injected to verify correct needle placement by assessing needle prick stimuli applied on the left and right side of the tail root and the perineal region, and the loss of tail and anal sphincter tone. Pressure measurements were recorded during penetration of the different tissue layers and in the epidural space. A clear and sudden decrease in the pitch of the acoustic signal was audible in all 12 cattle. All cows showed clinical effects indicating successful epidural anaesthesia. The pressure in the epidural space after puncture was -19±10 mm Hg. The device may be of assistance in identifying the epidural space in cattle.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:07 Mar 2012 12:58
Last Modified:26 Jan 2017 08:51
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1090-0233
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tvjl.2010.01.012
PubMed ID:20810294

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