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IgE-binding epitopes: a reappraisal


Aalberse, R C; Crameri, R (2011). IgE-binding epitopes: a reappraisal. Allergy, 66(10):1261-1274.

Abstract

Here, we discuss various questions related to IgE epitopes: What are the technical possibilities and pitfalls, what is currently known, how can we put this information into hypothetical frameworks and the unavoidable question: how useful is this information for patient care or allergenicity prediction? We discuss the information obtained by (i) 3D structures of allergen-antibody complexes; (ii) analysis of allergen analogues; (iii) mimics without obvious structural similarity; (iv) mAbs competing with IgE; (v) repertoire analysis of cloned IgEs, and other developments. Based on limited data, four suggestions are presented in the literature: (i) IgE might be more cross-reactive than IgG; (ii) IgE might be more often directed to immunologically 'uninviting' surfaces; (iii) IgE epitopes may tend to cluster and (iv) IgE paratopes might have a higher intrinsic flexibility. While these are not proven facts, they still can generate hypotheses for future research. The hypothesis is put forward that the IgE repertoire of switched B-cells is less influenced by positive selection, because positive selection might not be able to rescue IgE-switched B cells. While this might be of interest for the discussion about mechanisms leading to allergen-sensitization, we need to be modest in answering the 'clinical relevance' question. Current evidence indicates the IgE-epitope repertoire is too big to make specific IgE epitopes a realistic target for diagnosis, treatment or allergenicity prediction. In-depth analysis of a few selected IgE epitope-peptides or mimitopes derived from allergen-sequences and from random peptide libraries, respectively, might well prove rewarding in relation to diagnosis and prognosis of allergy, particularly food allergy.

Abstract

Here, we discuss various questions related to IgE epitopes: What are the technical possibilities and pitfalls, what is currently known, how can we put this information into hypothetical frameworks and the unavoidable question: how useful is this information for patient care or allergenicity prediction? We discuss the information obtained by (i) 3D structures of allergen-antibody complexes; (ii) analysis of allergen analogues; (iii) mimics without obvious structural similarity; (iv) mAbs competing with IgE; (v) repertoire analysis of cloned IgEs, and other developments. Based on limited data, four suggestions are presented in the literature: (i) IgE might be more cross-reactive than IgG; (ii) IgE might be more often directed to immunologically 'uninviting' surfaces; (iii) IgE epitopes may tend to cluster and (iv) IgE paratopes might have a higher intrinsic flexibility. While these are not proven facts, they still can generate hypotheses for future research. The hypothesis is put forward that the IgE repertoire of switched B-cells is less influenced by positive selection, because positive selection might not be able to rescue IgE-switched B cells. While this might be of interest for the discussion about mechanisms leading to allergen-sensitization, we need to be modest in answering the 'clinical relevance' question. Current evidence indicates the IgE-epitope repertoire is too big to make specific IgE epitopes a realistic target for diagnosis, treatment or allergenicity prediction. In-depth analysis of a few selected IgE epitope-peptides or mimitopes derived from allergen-sequences and from random peptide libraries, respectively, might well prove rewarding in relation to diagnosis and prognosis of allergy, particularly food allergy.

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43 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:October 2011
Deposited On:05 Mar 2012 14:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:41
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0105-4538
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1398-9995.2011.02656.x
PubMed ID:21623828

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