Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

ICTs and effective communication strategies: specific needs of information before,during and after disasters


Zemp, H (2011). ICTs and effective communication strategies: specific needs of information before,during and after disasters. In: The Fifth International Conference on Innovative Mobile and Internet Services in Ubiquitous Computing (IMIS-2011), Korean Bible University (KBU), Seoul, Korea, 30 June 2011 - 2 July 2011.

Abstract

There is a widespread agreement that the mass
media are a powerful and important source of people’s
perception of the world, the world of foreseen or unforeseen
disasters and risk being no exception. Within disaster
management the national media system is an especially
important means of disseminating warnings and information.
However, media organisations have their own
logic and goals that are not necessarily compatible with
the logics and goals of disaster planning and assistance
agencies. Thus, how the media interpret their responsibility
to warn and inform presents particular problems.
Recent developments in the media sector have altered the
production, content and reception of disaster and risk
messages in numerous ways. Additionally, increasing
numbers of natural and man-made disasters, with effects
that can be minimized, requires adaptations in disaster
management strategies. Here, the focus is on improving
current practices in communicating disasters and risk. On
the face of it, the use of advanced information and communications
technologies (ICTs), such as the internet for
emergency websites or cell phones appear to be good
solutions, bridging a gap between the public and disaster
management. However, if authorities take a technologically
determinist approach, they fail to account for the
ways in which audiences actually use information
sources. People are not passive absorbers of media information;
rather they are active seekers and users that
’make up their own minds’. When these factors are overlooked
plans to communicate with citizens can be undermined.
The research findings presented here, based upon
investigations of basic problems faced by the media in reporting
risk, public information needs and behaviour in
the face of risk perceptions leads to conclusions that are
the basis for recommendations to improve communication
strategies in disaster situations. This contribution will
identify some of the common challenges that emergency
management professional face in planning to meet the
needs of the population during and after disasters. The
use of ICTs and other strategies employed to minimize the
impact of a disaster are also discussed.

Abstract

There is a widespread agreement that the mass
media are a powerful and important source of people’s
perception of the world, the world of foreseen or unforeseen
disasters and risk being no exception. Within disaster
management the national media system is an especially
important means of disseminating warnings and information.
However, media organisations have their own
logic and goals that are not necessarily compatible with
the logics and goals of disaster planning and assistance
agencies. Thus, how the media interpret their responsibility
to warn and inform presents particular problems.
Recent developments in the media sector have altered the
production, content and reception of disaster and risk
messages in numerous ways. Additionally, increasing
numbers of natural and man-made disasters, with effects
that can be minimized, requires adaptations in disaster
management strategies. Here, the focus is on improving
current practices in communicating disasters and risk. On
the face of it, the use of advanced information and communications
technologies (ICTs), such as the internet for
emergency websites or cell phones appear to be good
solutions, bridging a gap between the public and disaster
management. However, if authorities take a technologically
determinist approach, they fail to account for the
ways in which audiences actually use information
sources. People are not passive absorbers of media information;
rather they are active seekers and users that
’make up their own minds’. When these factors are overlooked
plans to communicate with citizens can be undermined.
The research findings presented here, based upon
investigations of basic problems faced by the media in reporting
risk, public information needs and behaviour in
the face of risk perceptions leads to conclusions that are
the basis for recommendations to improve communication
strategies in disaster situations. This contribution will
identify some of the common challenges that emergency
management professional face in planning to meet the
needs of the population during and after disasters. The
use of ICTs and other strategies employed to minimize the
impact of a disaster are also discussed.

Statistics

Downloads

33 downloads since deposited on 05 Mar 2012
4 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Mass Communication and Media Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:700 Arts
Uncontrolled Keywords:risk communication, natural disaster, media change, new media, risk perception, risk management, media user
Language:English
Event End Date:2 July 2011
Deposited On:05 Mar 2012 17:27
Last Modified:13 Aug 2017 02:13
Publisher:Innovative Mobile and Internet Services in Ubiquitous Computing (IMIS)
Number of Pages:6
Official URL:http://www.takilab.org/conf/imis/2011/

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 530kB

Article Networks

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations