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The IgE-binding self-antigens tubulin-α and HLA-DR-α are overexpressed in lesional skin of atopic eczema patients


Rhyner, C; Zeller, S; Johansson, C; Scheynius, A; Crameri, R (2011). The IgE-binding self-antigens tubulin-α and HLA-DR-α are overexpressed in lesional skin of atopic eczema patients. Journal of Clinical & Cellular Immunology, 2:109.

Abstract

Background: Atopic eczema is the most common chronic, relapsing, inflammatory skin disorder with an atopic background. Previous studies have shown that IgE-mediated reactivity to self-antigens plays a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. However, the expression of self-antigens associated with atopic eczema in the lesional skin is poorly investigated.

Aim of the study: This study was aimed to show that IgE-binding self antigens are over-expressed in atopic eczema lesions.

Methods: Tubulin-a and HLA-DR-a, two recently described self-antigens, were stained by immunohistochemistry in skin specimens from chronic and acute atopic eczema lesions, unaffected skin from the same patients or skin from healthy controls.

Results: The expression of tubulin-a and HLA-DR-a is up-regulated in atopic eczema lesions compared to nonlesional or healthy skin and correlates with the number of infiltrating immune cells and the degree of inflammation.

Conclusion: Upregulation of IgE-binding self-antigens in lesional skin of atopic eczema patients might further promote the existing inflammation and induce exacerbations of the disease in the absence of exposure to environmental allergens.

Abstract

Background: Atopic eczema is the most common chronic, relapsing, inflammatory skin disorder with an atopic background. Previous studies have shown that IgE-mediated reactivity to self-antigens plays a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. However, the expression of self-antigens associated with atopic eczema in the lesional skin is poorly investigated.

Aim of the study: This study was aimed to show that IgE-binding self antigens are over-expressed in atopic eczema lesions.

Methods: Tubulin-a and HLA-DR-a, two recently described self-antigens, were stained by immunohistochemistry in skin specimens from chronic and acute atopic eczema lesions, unaffected skin from the same patients or skin from healthy controls.

Results: The expression of tubulin-a and HLA-DR-a is up-regulated in atopic eczema lesions compared to nonlesional or healthy skin and correlates with the number of infiltrating immune cells and the degree of inflammation.

Conclusion: Upregulation of IgE-binding self-antigens in lesional skin of atopic eczema patients might further promote the existing inflammation and induce exacerbations of the disease in the absence of exposure to environmental allergens.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:11 Mar 2012 10:33
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:42
Publisher:Omics Publishing Group
ISSN:2155-9899
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4172/2155- 9899.1000109

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