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Intralymphatic immunotherapy: from the rationale to human applications - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Senti, G; Johansen, P; Kündig, T M (2011). Intralymphatic immunotherapy: from the rationale to human applications. In: Valenta, R; Coffman, R L. Vaccines against Allergies. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer, 71-84.

Abstract

Allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only treatment of IgE mediated allergies that is causative and has a long-term effect. Classically, SIT requires numerous subcutaneous injections of the allergen during 3-5 years. Over the last decade sublingual allergen applications have established as an alternative, but treatment duration could not be shortened. This review focuses on direct administration of vaccines in general and of allergens in particular into lymph nodes with the aim to enhance immunotherapy. Several studies have found that direct injection of antigens into lymph nodes enhanced immune responses. Recently we have focused on intralymphatic allergen administration in order to enhance SIT. Data in mouse models and in clinical trials showed that intralymphatic allergen administration strongly enhanced SIT, so that the number of allergen injections could be reduced to three, and the allergen dose could be reduced 10-100 fold. Intralymphatic injections proved easy, practically painless and safe. In mice and men, intralymphatic immunotherapy injecting allergens into a subcutaneous lymph node markedly enhances the protective immune response, so that both the dose and number of allergen injections can be reduced, making SIT safer and faster, which enhances patient convenience and compliance.

Abstract

Allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only treatment of IgE mediated allergies that is causative and has a long-term effect. Classically, SIT requires numerous subcutaneous injections of the allergen during 3-5 years. Over the last decade sublingual allergen applications have established as an alternative, but treatment duration could not be shortened. This review focuses on direct administration of vaccines in general and of allergens in particular into lymph nodes with the aim to enhance immunotherapy. Several studies have found that direct injection of antigens into lymph nodes enhanced immune responses. Recently we have focused on intralymphatic allergen administration in order to enhance SIT. Data in mouse models and in clinical trials showed that intralymphatic allergen administration strongly enhanced SIT, so that the number of allergen injections could be reduced to three, and the allergen dose could be reduced 10-100 fold. Intralymphatic injections proved easy, practically painless and safe. In mice and men, intralymphatic immunotherapy injecting allergens into a subcutaneous lymph node markedly enhances the protective immune response, so that both the dose and number of allergen injections can be reduced, making SIT safer and faster, which enhances patient convenience and compliance.

Citations

17 citations in Web of Science®
21 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute for Regenerative Medicine (IREM)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Date:2011
Deposited On:05 Mar 2012 17:13
Last Modified:15 Dec 2016 14:48
Publisher:Springer
Series Name:Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology
Number:352
ISSN:0070-217X
ISBN:978-3-642-20053-3
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/82_2011_133
PubMed ID:21725898

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