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Does team size matter in mobile learning?


Schwabe, Gerhard; Göth, Christoph; Frohberg, Dirk (2005). Does team size matter in mobile learning? In: International Conference on Mobile Business 2005, Washington, 11 July 2005 - 13 July 2005, 227-234.

Abstract

Most mobile learning applications support individual users, although experience with similar conventional learning games indicates that teams may be more appropriate. This paper reports on tests of the MobileGame to see whether individual users, teams of two, teams of three or teams of four are more successful. The test was conducted with over 100 natural users. The significantly increased activity level and team-building show that a preference for teams of two rather than individual players would be justified. There is little significant evidence to prefer teams of two to teams of three. However, the data shows that teams of four are suboptimal: this team size decreases fun and immersion as well as (maybe) learning. There is no evidence that these negative effects are balanced by improved team-building. The relatively high success of teams of two leads to a need for more research on dyadic users not only for mobile learning games, but also for other areas such as tourism, health, museum visitors, and entertainment.

Abstract

Most mobile learning applications support individual users, although experience with similar conventional learning games indicates that teams may be more appropriate. This paper reports on tests of the MobileGame to see whether individual users, teams of two, teams of three or teams of four are more successful. The test was conducted with over 100 natural users. The significantly increased activity level and team-building show that a preference for teams of two rather than individual players would be justified. There is little significant evidence to prefer teams of two to teams of three. However, the data shows that teams of four are suboptimal: this team size decreases fun and immersion as well as (maybe) learning. There is no evidence that these negative effects are balanced by improved team-building. The relatively high success of teams of two leads to a need for more research on dyadic users not only for mobile learning games, but also for other areas such as tourism, health, museum visitors, and entertainment.

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1 citation in Web of Science®
21 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Event End Date:13 July 2005
Deposited On:08 Aug 2012 08:52
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 13:40
Publisher:IEEE Computer Society
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1109/ICMB.2005.35
Official URL:http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=1493613&tag=1
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:2697

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