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Controlling ambiguities in legislative language - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Bünzli, Alexandra; Höfler, Stefan (2012). Controlling ambiguities in legislative language. In: Rosner, Mike; Fuchs, Norbert E. Controlled Natural Language - Second International Workshop, CNL 2010. Berlin: Springer, 21-42.

Abstract

Legislative language exhibits some characteristics typical of languages of administration that are particularly prone to eliciting ambiguities.
However, ambiguity is generally undesirable in legislative texts and can pose problems for the interpretation and application of codified law. In this paper, we demonstrate how methods of controlled natural languages can be applied to prevent ambiguities in legislative texts.
We investigate what types of ambiguities are frequent in legislative language and therefore important to control, and we examine which ambiguities are already controlled by existing drafting guidelines. For those not covered by the guidelines, we propose additional control mechanisms.
Wherever possible, the devised mechanisms reflect existing conventions and frequency distributions and exploit domain-specific means to make ambiguities explicit.

Abstract

Legislative language exhibits some characteristics typical of languages of administration that are particularly prone to eliciting ambiguities.
However, ambiguity is generally undesirable in legislative texts and can pose problems for the interpretation and application of codified law. In this paper, we demonstrate how methods of controlled natural languages can be applied to prevent ambiguities in legislative texts.
We investigate what types of ambiguities are frequent in legislative language and therefore important to control, and we examine which ambiguities are already controlled by existing drafting guidelines. For those not covered by the guidelines, we propose additional control mechanisms.
Wherever possible, the devised mechanisms reflect existing conventions and frequency distributions and exploit domain-specific means to make ambiguities explicit.

Citations

1 citation in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Computational Linguistics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
410 Linguistics
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:03 May 2012 09:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:47
Publisher:Springer
Series Name:Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence
Number:7175
ISBN:978-3-642-31174-1
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-31175-8_2

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