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Spectrodirectional remote sensing for the improved estimation of biophysical and -chemical variables: two case studies


Schaepman, M E; Koetz, B; Schaepman-Strub, G; Itten, K I (2005). Spectrodirectional remote sensing for the improved estimation of biophysical and -chemical variables: two case studies. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, 6(3-4):271-282.

Abstract

Over the past few years, significant advancements are made in the acquisition, processing, analysis and interpretation of quantitative directional and high spectral resolution data. In particular, the broader availability of air- and spaceborne directional imaging spectrometer data supports the estimation of biophysical and -chemical variables with unprecedented accuracy and in calibrated physical units. We describe in this paper two experiments that we carried out to demonstrate regional performance of spectral and directional-based retrieval approaches in vegetated areas. In the first case study, we focus on a mountain forest located in South-Eastern Switzerland representing a boreal forest like ecosystem. DAIS7915 imaging spectrometer data have been acquired with simultaneous ground measurements. We describe the soil–vegetation–atmosphere radiative transfer using a combination of the PROSPECT, GeoSAIL, and ATCOR models. In the second case study, we acquired spectrodirectional data on ground using a field goniometer in parallel with several HyMap imaging spectrometer overflights. Both cases demonstrate conditions for the estimation of biophysical and -chemical canopy properties with reduced uncertainties by respecting the full spectral coverage and directionality of the data. We conclude that the derived canopy variables represent the actual spatial distribution of properties as they occur in the landscape.

Abstract

Over the past few years, significant advancements are made in the acquisition, processing, analysis and interpretation of quantitative directional and high spectral resolution data. In particular, the broader availability of air- and spaceborne directional imaging spectrometer data supports the estimation of biophysical and -chemical variables with unprecedented accuracy and in calibrated physical units. We describe in this paper two experiments that we carried out to demonstrate regional performance of spectral and directional-based retrieval approaches in vegetated areas. In the first case study, we focus on a mountain forest located in South-Eastern Switzerland representing a boreal forest like ecosystem. DAIS7915 imaging spectrometer data have been acquired with simultaneous ground measurements. We describe the soil–vegetation–atmosphere radiative transfer using a combination of the PROSPECT, GeoSAIL, and ATCOR models. In the second case study, we acquired spectrodirectional data on ground using a field goniometer in parallel with several HyMap imaging spectrometer overflights. Both cases demonstrate conditions for the estimation of biophysical and -chemical canopy properties with reduced uncertainties by respecting the full spectral coverage and directionality of the data. We conclude that the derived canopy variables represent the actual spatial distribution of properties as they occur in the landscape.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2005
Deposited On:18 Jul 2012 15:25
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:48
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0303-2434
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jag.2004.10.012

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