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Dropping out from apprenticeship training as an opportunity for change


Schmid, Evi; Stalder, Barbara E (2012). Dropping out from apprenticeship training as an opportunity for change. In: Tynjälä, Päivi; Stenström, Marja-Leena; Saarnivaara, Marjatta. Transitions and Transformations in Learning and Education. Dordrecht: Springer, 117-130.

Abstract

In recent years, the VET systems in Germany and Switzerland have been characterised by a shortage of training places which has created a fierce competition for those places among candidates. Nowadays, in Switzerland, almost one out of three school-leaving VET applicants has to wait at least 1 year until he or she secures a suitable place of apprenticeship. Furthermore, the dropout rate in apprenticeships is quite high and challenges educational policy. About one in five apprenticeship contracts is terminated without the apprentice having achieved the aspired degree on the secondary level. Dropping out of vocational education puts youths at great risk of not gaining re-entry into upper secondary education and staying without a secondary level degree. A Swiss survey following circa 1,300 young persons 3 years after dropping out of apprenticeship training shows that three-quarters of the dropouts continued their education within these three years. Although the time around the drop out had been a strain for these young people, most of the ‘education returners’ are more satisfied with their new education than before dropping out. These findings suggest that dropping out of education is not bad per se and should not be avoided in every case. Dropping out can also provide an opportunity to solve problems concerning one’s education, to improve one’s educational situation and to realign. After having changed to another company, another educational level or another field, around two-thirds tend to finish their vocational education. Nonetheless, for one-third of youths dropping out of education represents the end of any education on the upper secondary level. The aim of this chapter is to follow the life courses of dropouts, to describe the educational situation they are in during the first 3 years after dropping out of their apprenticeship training and to discuss in what way dropping out may represent an opportunity for change.

Abstract

In recent years, the VET systems in Germany and Switzerland have been characterised by a shortage of training places which has created a fierce competition for those places among candidates. Nowadays, in Switzerland, almost one out of three school-leaving VET applicants has to wait at least 1 year until he or she secures a suitable place of apprenticeship. Furthermore, the dropout rate in apprenticeships is quite high and challenges educational policy. About one in five apprenticeship contracts is terminated without the apprentice having achieved the aspired degree on the secondary level. Dropping out of vocational education puts youths at great risk of not gaining re-entry into upper secondary education and staying without a secondary level degree. A Swiss survey following circa 1,300 young persons 3 years after dropping out of apprenticeship training shows that three-quarters of the dropouts continued their education within these three years. Although the time around the drop out had been a strain for these young people, most of the ‘education returners’ are more satisfied with their new education than before dropping out. These findings suggest that dropping out of education is not bad per se and should not be avoided in every case. Dropping out can also provide an opportunity to solve problems concerning one’s education, to improve one’s educational situation and to realign. After having changed to another company, another educational level or another field, around two-thirds tend to finish their vocational education. Nonetheless, for one-third of youths dropping out of education represents the end of any education on the upper secondary level. The aim of this chapter is to follow the life courses of dropouts, to describe the educational situation they are in during the first 3 years after dropping out of their apprenticeship training and to discuss in what way dropping out may represent an opportunity for change.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Education
Dewey Decimal Classification:370 Education
Language:English
Date:April 2012
Deposited On:09 May 2012 08:48
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:48
Publisher:Springer
ISBN:978-94-007-2311-5
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-2312-2_8

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