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ARTD1 deletion causes increased hepatic lipid accumulation in mice fed a high-fat diet and impairs adipocyte function and differentiation


Erener, Süheda; Mirsaidi, Ali; Hesse, Mareike; Tiaden, André N; Ellingsgaard, Helga; Kostadinova, Radina; Donath, Marc Y; Richards, Peter J; Hottiger, Michael O (2012). ARTD1 deletion causes increased hepatic lipid accumulation in mice fed a high-fat diet and impairs adipocyte function and differentiation. FASEB Journal, 26(6):2631-2638.

Abstract

ADP-ribosyltransferase Diphtheria toxin-like 1 [ARTD1; formerly called poly-ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1)] is a chromatin-associated enzyme involved in regulating metabolic homeostasis. The liver is at the core of glucose and lipid metabolism and is significantly affected by obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Here, we show that when fed a high-fat diet (HFD), mice lacking ARTD1 developed exacerbated hepatic steatosis. ARTD1(-/-) mice had a 19% higher liver weight than wild-type (WT) animals and exhibited a significantly increased serum concentration of cholesterol (38%) and impaired glucose tolerance. In addition, adipocyte function and size were significantly reduced in ARTD1(-/-) mice fed an HFD (7794 μm(2) for WT and 5579 μm(2) for ARTD1(-/-) mice). The significantly reduced adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) isolated from ARTD1(-/-) mice (28 vs. 11% Oil red O-positive cells in WT and ARTD1(-/-) ASCs, respectively) suggested that impaired adipogenesis as the underlying cause for this adipose tissue malfunction. This function of ARTD1 was specific for adipogenesis, since osteogenic differentiation was not affected by the ARTD1 deletion. In summary, we show that ARTD1(-/-) mice fed an HFD display impaired adipogenesis and show exacerbated hepatic steatosis, which can have important implications for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.-Erener, S., Mirsaidi, A., Hesse, M., Tiaden, A. N., Ellingsgaard, H., Kostadinova, R., Donath, M. Y., Richards, P. J., Hottiger, M. O. ARTD1 deletion causes increased hepatic lipid accumulation in mice fed a high-fat diet and impairs adipocyte function and differentiation.

Abstract

ADP-ribosyltransferase Diphtheria toxin-like 1 [ARTD1; formerly called poly-ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1)] is a chromatin-associated enzyme involved in regulating metabolic homeostasis. The liver is at the core of glucose and lipid metabolism and is significantly affected by obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Here, we show that when fed a high-fat diet (HFD), mice lacking ARTD1 developed exacerbated hepatic steatosis. ARTD1(-/-) mice had a 19% higher liver weight than wild-type (WT) animals and exhibited a significantly increased serum concentration of cholesterol (38%) and impaired glucose tolerance. In addition, adipocyte function and size were significantly reduced in ARTD1(-/-) mice fed an HFD (7794 μm(2) for WT and 5579 μm(2) for ARTD1(-/-) mice). The significantly reduced adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) isolated from ARTD1(-/-) mice (28 vs. 11% Oil red O-positive cells in WT and ARTD1(-/-) ASCs, respectively) suggested that impaired adipogenesis as the underlying cause for this adipose tissue malfunction. This function of ARTD1 was specific for adipogenesis, since osteogenic differentiation was not affected by the ARTD1 deletion. In summary, we show that ARTD1(-/-) mice fed an HFD display impaired adipogenesis and show exacerbated hepatic steatosis, which can have important implications for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.-Erener, S., Mirsaidi, A., Hesse, M., Tiaden, A. N., Ellingsgaard, H., Kostadinova, R., Donath, M. Y., Richards, P. J., Hottiger, M. O. ARTD1 deletion causes increased hepatic lipid accumulation in mice fed a high-fat diet and impairs adipocyte function and differentiation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Department of Molecular Mechanisms of Disease
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Molecular Mechanisms of Disease

05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Center for Applied Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:06 Jul 2012 07:47
Last Modified:23 Nov 2017 11:02
Publisher:Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
ISSN:0892-6638
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1096/fj.11-200212
PubMed ID:22426118

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