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Effects of jumping exercise on maximum ground reaction force and bone in 8- to 12-year-old boys and girls: a 9-month randomized controlled trial


Anliker, E; Dick, C; Rawer, R; Toigo, M (2012). Effects of jumping exercise on maximum ground reaction force and bone in 8- to 12-year-old boys and girls: a 9-month randomized controlled trial. Journal of Musculoskeletal & Neuronal Interactions, 12(2):56-67.

Abstract

Objectives: To assess adaptations of the lower leg muscle-bone unit in 8- to 12-year-old children following a randomized controlled jumping exercise intervention for 9 months. Methods: Twelve boys and 10 girls (INT) performed a supervised jumping protocol during the first 10 min of their regularly scheduled physical education class twice a week, while 11 boys and 12 girls (CON) completed the regular curriculum. We assessed maximum voluntary ground reaction force during multiple one-legged hopping (F(m1LH)), and tibial bone strength/geometry by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) at the 4-, 14-, 38- and 66%-site pre, intermediate, and post intervention. Results: Whether increases in F(m1LH) (+2.1% points, P= 0.752), nor changes in bone strength/geometry (+1 to +3% points, 0.169<P<0.861), were significantly different for INT relative to CON. The relationship between F(m1LH) and volumetric bone mineral content at the 14%-site (vBMC(14%)) was very strong for both groups, pre and post intervention (0.51≤R(2)≤0.88). However, changes in F(m1LH) and vBMC(14%) were not correlated. Conclusions: In children, growth and exercise did not increase maximum muscle force and bone strength in proportion to each other, meaning that the adaptive processes were not tightly coupled or follow different time courses.

Abstract

Objectives: To assess adaptations of the lower leg muscle-bone unit in 8- to 12-year-old children following a randomized controlled jumping exercise intervention for 9 months. Methods: Twelve boys and 10 girls (INT) performed a supervised jumping protocol during the first 10 min of their regularly scheduled physical education class twice a week, while 11 boys and 12 girls (CON) completed the regular curriculum. We assessed maximum voluntary ground reaction force during multiple one-legged hopping (F(m1LH)), and tibial bone strength/geometry by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) at the 4-, 14-, 38- and 66%-site pre, intermediate, and post intervention. Results: Whether increases in F(m1LH) (+2.1% points, P= 0.752), nor changes in bone strength/geometry (+1 to +3% points, 0.169<P<0.861), were significantly different for INT relative to CON. The relationship between F(m1LH) and volumetric bone mineral content at the 14%-site (vBMC(14%)) was very strong for both groups, pre and post intervention (0.51≤R(2)≤0.88). However, changes in F(m1LH) and vBMC(14%) were not correlated. Conclusions: In children, growth and exercise did not increase maximum muscle force and bone strength in proportion to each other, meaning that the adaptive processes were not tightly coupled or follow different time courses.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:09 Jul 2012 07:32
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 14:25
Publisher:International Society of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions
ISSN:1108-7161
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://www.ismni.org/jmni/pdf/48/02DICK.pdf
PubMed ID:22647278

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