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Is the association between various emotion-regulation skills and mental health mediated by the ability to modify emotions? Results from two cross-sectional studies


Berking, M; Poppe, C; Luhmann, M; Wuppernmann, P; Jaggi, V; Seifritz, E (2012). Is the association between various emotion-regulation skills and mental health mediated by the ability to modify emotions? Results from two cross-sectional studies. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 43(3):931-937.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In order to clarify mechanisms underlying the association between emotion regulation and psychopathology, we tested whether the ability to modify negative emotions mediates the associations of other emotion-regulation skills with psychopathological symptoms in two studies.
METHODS: The first study included 151 college students; the second included 121 psychiatric inpatients. Bootstrapping-enhanced mediation analyses were utilized to assess associations between self-reports of emotion-regulation skills and psychopathology, as well as potential mediation effects.
RESULTS: In both samples, the ability to modify emotions completely mediated the association between symptoms and skills for most skills, but not for the skill of accepting/tolerating negative emotions.
LIMITATIONS: Major limitations include the use of a cross-sectional design as well as exclusive use of self-report data.
CONCLUSIONS: The ability to modify negative emotions may be the common pathway by which many emotion-regulation skills exert their influence on mental health; however, the skill of accepting/tolerating negative emotions may be beneficial to mental health regardless of whether or not it facilitates modification of emotions.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In order to clarify mechanisms underlying the association between emotion regulation and psychopathology, we tested whether the ability to modify negative emotions mediates the associations of other emotion-regulation skills with psychopathological symptoms in two studies.
METHODS: The first study included 151 college students; the second included 121 psychiatric inpatients. Bootstrapping-enhanced mediation analyses were utilized to assess associations between self-reports of emotion-regulation skills and psychopathology, as well as potential mediation effects.
RESULTS: In both samples, the ability to modify emotions completely mediated the association between symptoms and skills for most skills, but not for the skill of accepting/tolerating negative emotions.
LIMITATIONS: Major limitations include the use of a cross-sectional design as well as exclusive use of self-report data.
CONCLUSIONS: The ability to modify negative emotions may be the common pathway by which many emotion-regulation skills exert their influence on mental health; however, the skill of accepting/tolerating negative emotions may be beneficial to mental health regardless of whether or not it facilitates modification of emotions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:09 Jul 2012 09:17
Last Modified:16 Feb 2018 23:35
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0005-7916
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.btep.2011.09.009
PubMed ID:22406495

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