Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Why do Greater one-horned rhinoceroses (Rhinoceros unicornis) die? - An evaluation of necropsy reports


Wyss, F; Wenker, C; Robert, N; Clauss, Marcus; von Houwald, F (2012). Why do Greater one-horned rhinoceroses (Rhinoceros unicornis) die? - An evaluation of necropsy reports. In: International Conference on Diseases of Zoo and Wild Animals, Bussulengo/Verona, Italy, 16 May 2012 - 19 May 2012, 54-61.

Abstract

Many case reports about different diseases in greater one-horned rhinoceroses (Rhinoceros unicornis) have been published, but an overview of the prevalence of diseases and an evaluation of causes of death is lacking. Necropsy reports of 106 greater one-horned rhinoceroses from 38 zoos worldwide were evaluated. Half of them were from adult animals, a third from perinatal deaths/stillbirths and the rest from juveniles and sub adults. Cardiac problems (cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, heart infarct) and cardiovascular failure due to gastrointestinal or pulmonary disease were the most frequent causes of death in adults. Among gastrointestinal problems, gastric ulcers and impactions, often with sand, were the most frequent findings. Sixteen adult greater one-horned rhinoceroses were euthanised, mainly due to chronic disease, foot problems or uterine leiomyomas. The two latter problems are suspected to be associated with obesity, and most of the animals with these problems were reported to be in good body condition at death. Leiomyomas are additionally thought to be predisposed by repeated oestrus cycles without pregnancy. Foot problems were only noted in 6 % of the animals and are probably underestimated in this dataset. Systematic documentation of necropsy findings is desirable, including complete animal identity, anamnesis, circumstances of death (natural death, euthanasia, and stillbirth), body condition scoring and weight.

Abstract

Many case reports about different diseases in greater one-horned rhinoceroses (Rhinoceros unicornis) have been published, but an overview of the prevalence of diseases and an evaluation of causes of death is lacking. Necropsy reports of 106 greater one-horned rhinoceroses from 38 zoos worldwide were evaluated. Half of them were from adult animals, a third from perinatal deaths/stillbirths and the rest from juveniles and sub adults. Cardiac problems (cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, heart infarct) and cardiovascular failure due to gastrointestinal or pulmonary disease were the most frequent causes of death in adults. Among gastrointestinal problems, gastric ulcers and impactions, often with sand, were the most frequent findings. Sixteen adult greater one-horned rhinoceroses were euthanised, mainly due to chronic disease, foot problems or uterine leiomyomas. The two latter problems are suspected to be associated with obesity, and most of the animals with these problems were reported to be in good body condition at death. Leiomyomas are additionally thought to be predisposed by repeated oestrus cycles without pregnancy. Foot problems were only noted in 6 % of the animals and are probably underestimated in this dataset. Systematic documentation of necropsy findings is desirable, including complete animal identity, anamnesis, circumstances of death (natural death, euthanasia, and stillbirth), body condition scoring and weight.

Statistics

Downloads

174 downloads since deposited on 10 Jul 2012
21 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), not refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Event End Date:19 May 2012
Deposited On:10 Jul 2012 06:54
Last Modified:13 Aug 2017 08:39
Series Name:Proceedings of the International Conference on Diseases of Zoo and Wild Animals
Number:4
ISSN:1868-5846
Related URLs:http://www.zoovet-conference.org/

Download

Download PDF  'Why do Greater one-horned rhinoceroses (Rhinoceros unicornis) die? - An evaluation of necropsy reports'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 87kB