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Post-surgical scalp wounds with exposed bone treated with a plant-derived wound therapeutic


Läuchli, S; Hafner, J; Wehrmann, C; French, L E; Hunziker, T (2012). Post-surgical scalp wounds with exposed bone treated with a plant-derived wound therapeutic. Journal of Wound Care, 21(5):228-233.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:
To evaluate the efficacy of a plant-derived wound dressing, a mixture of hypericum oil (Hypericum perforatum) and neem oil (Azadirachta indica), in scalp wounds with exposed bone.
METHOD:
A retrospective review was conducted of all patients presenting with scalp wounds with exposed bone following the excision of skin tumours and treated with a plant-derived wound dressings (1 Primary Wound Dressing; Phytoceuticals AG), from January to July 2011. Time to healing, wound size, area of exposed bone, ease of handling, pain and complications were evaluated.
RESULTS:
Nine consecutive patients were analysed retrospectively. The patients' mean age was 81.2 ± 8.5 years (63-90 years), with a mean wound size of 13.2 ± 6.8cm(2) (0.4-22.6cm(2)) and 6.8 ± 6.5cm(2) (0.3-20.7cm(2)) of exposed bone. The time to complete healing by secondary intention was 4-20 weeks. A rapid induction of granulation tissue was observed, which covered the entire exposed bone surface in six out of nine cases (67%) after 4 weeks, and showed a reduction in the mean area of exposed bone of 95%. Dressing change was easy and without pain and there were no complications.
CONCLUSION:
This retrospective, non-controlled analysis suggests that ONE is a very simple to use, safe and potentially effective therapy for the treatment of scalp wounds with exposed bone.
DECLARATION OF INTEREST:
There were no external sources of funding for this study. The authors have no conflict of interest to declare.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:
To evaluate the efficacy of a plant-derived wound dressing, a mixture of hypericum oil (Hypericum perforatum) and neem oil (Azadirachta indica), in scalp wounds with exposed bone.
METHOD:
A retrospective review was conducted of all patients presenting with scalp wounds with exposed bone following the excision of skin tumours and treated with a plant-derived wound dressings (1 Primary Wound Dressing; Phytoceuticals AG), from January to July 2011. Time to healing, wound size, area of exposed bone, ease of handling, pain and complications were evaluated.
RESULTS:
Nine consecutive patients were analysed retrospectively. The patients' mean age was 81.2 ± 8.5 years (63-90 years), with a mean wound size of 13.2 ± 6.8cm(2) (0.4-22.6cm(2)) and 6.8 ± 6.5cm(2) (0.3-20.7cm(2)) of exposed bone. The time to complete healing by secondary intention was 4-20 weeks. A rapid induction of granulation tissue was observed, which covered the entire exposed bone surface in six out of nine cases (67%) after 4 weeks, and showed a reduction in the mean area of exposed bone of 95%. Dressing change was easy and without pain and there were no complications.
CONCLUSION:
This retrospective, non-controlled analysis suggests that ONE is a very simple to use, safe and potentially effective therapy for the treatment of scalp wounds with exposed bone.
DECLARATION OF INTEREST:
There were no external sources of funding for this study. The authors have no conflict of interest to declare.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:12 Jul 2012 06:59
Last Modified:16 Feb 2018 23:37
Publisher:Mark Allen Publishing
ISSN:0969-0700
OA Status:Closed
Official URL:http://www.internurse.com/cgi-bin/go.pl/library/article.cgi?uid=91577;article=JWC_21_5_228_233
PubMed ID:22584740

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