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Making close to suitable for web search: A comparison of two approaches


Helming, Iris; Bernstein, Abraham; Grütter, Rolf; Vock, Setphan (2011). Making close to suitable for web search: A comparison of two approaches. In: Terra Cognita - Foundations, Technologies and Applications of the Geospatial Web, Bonn, Germany, 23 October 2011 - 27 October 2011.

Abstract

In this paper we compare two approaches to model the vague german spatial relation in der Na ?he von (English: ”close to”) to enable its usage in (semantic) web searches. A user wants, for example, to find all relevant documents regarding parks or forestal landscapes close to a city. The problem is that there are no clear metric distance limits for possibly matching places because they are only restricted via the vague natural language expression. And since human perception does not work only in distances we can’t handle the queries simply with metric dis- tances. Our first approach models the meaning of these expressions in description logics using relations of the Region Connection Calculus. A formalism has been developed to find all instances that are potentially perceived as close to. The second approach deals with the idea that ev- erything that can be reached in a reasonable amount of time with a given means of transport (e.g. car) is potentially perceived as close. This ap- proach uses route calculations with a route planner. The first approach has already been evaluated. The second is still under development. But we can already show a correlation between what people consider as close to and time needed to get there.

Abstract

In this paper we compare two approaches to model the vague german spatial relation in der Na ?he von (English: ”close to”) to enable its usage in (semantic) web searches. A user wants, for example, to find all relevant documents regarding parks or forestal landscapes close to a city. The problem is that there are no clear metric distance limits for possibly matching places because they are only restricted via the vague natural language expression. And since human perception does not work only in distances we can’t handle the queries simply with metric dis- tances. Our first approach models the meaning of these expressions in description logics using relations of the Region Connection Calculus. A formalism has been developed to find all instances that are potentially perceived as close to. The second approach deals with the idea that ev- erything that can be reached in a reasonable amount of time with a given means of transport (e.g. car) is potentially perceived as close. This ap- proach uses route calculations with a route planner. The first approach has already been evaluated. The second is still under development. But we can already show a correlation between what people consider as close to and time needed to get there.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Event End Date:27 October 2011
Deposited On:10 Aug 2012 13:03
Last Modified:13 Apr 2017 09:45
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://iswc2011.semanticweb.org/fileadmin/iswc/Papers/Workshops/Terra/paper9.pdf
Related URLs:http://iswc2011.semanticweb.org/workshops/terra-cognita-foundations-technologies-and-applications-of-the-geospatial-web/
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:3880

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