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Geschlechterunterschied bei Depression: Bahnen emotionale Reaktion im Alltag depressive Reaktionstendenzen?


Bodenmann, Guy (1996). Geschlechterunterschied bei Depression: Bahnen emotionale Reaktion im Alltag depressive Reaktionstendenzen? Zeitschrift für klinische Psychologie, Psychiatrie Und Psychotherapie, 44(4):362-381.

Abstract

In this article, we discuss the question as to why more women suffer from depression than do men. Although many studies have been conducted in an attempt to better understand the gender differences concerning depression, most of the work done in this field has focused upon depressive patients. Consequently, insufficient knowledge concerning the mechanisms connected to gender which lead to depression exists. We assume that depression is a consequence of an already depressiogenic cognitive style practiced in everyday life. Women tend to deal in a different (and more negative) manner with failure and frustration in daily stress situations than do men. Women's behavior is characterized by a dysfunctional attributional style, by less appropriate goals, more negative coping strategies and a less favourable primary appraisal. In addition, their emotional reactions depend to a great extent upon these intrapsychic maladaptive processes. These daily life patterns in turn predispose women to depression in situations oi great stress (critical life events, chronic stress, etc.). Although these ideas in themselves are not new, the methodological approach presented in this study addresses this issue in a novel may for the following two reasons: Firstly, rather than focusing upon depression, we focus upon sadness (as a normal range emotional response) in an effort to undercover the precursors of depression. Secondly, we use a particularly broad data base (selfreport data; independant observer ratings; experimental data; ratings from field studies, etc.). The results found in this study support our hypothesis that the way in which women manage failure in stress situations is more dysfunctional than the way men cope with similar situations and that Nomen react with more sadness than do men. These findings cannot. be explained solely by a higher level of emotional expressiveness in our female subjects.

Abstract

In this article, we discuss the question as to why more women suffer from depression than do men. Although many studies have been conducted in an attempt to better understand the gender differences concerning depression, most of the work done in this field has focused upon depressive patients. Consequently, insufficient knowledge concerning the mechanisms connected to gender which lead to depression exists. We assume that depression is a consequence of an already depressiogenic cognitive style practiced in everyday life. Women tend to deal in a different (and more negative) manner with failure and frustration in daily stress situations than do men. Women's behavior is characterized by a dysfunctional attributional style, by less appropriate goals, more negative coping strategies and a less favourable primary appraisal. In addition, their emotional reactions depend to a great extent upon these intrapsychic maladaptive processes. These daily life patterns in turn predispose women to depression in situations oi great stress (critical life events, chronic stress, etc.). Although these ideas in themselves are not new, the methodological approach presented in this study addresses this issue in a novel may for the following two reasons: Firstly, rather than focusing upon depression, we focus upon sadness (as a normal range emotional response) in an effort to undercover the precursors of depression. Secondly, we use a particularly broad data base (selfreport data; independant observer ratings; experimental data; ratings from field studies, etc.). The results found in this study support our hypothesis that the way in which women manage failure in stress situations is more dysfunctional than the way men cope with similar situations and that Nomen react with more sadness than do men. These findings cannot. be explained solely by a higher level of emotional expressiveness in our female subjects.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Gender differences concerning depression: do the emotional reactions in daily life lead to depressions
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:1996
Deposited On:27 Jul 2012 10:08
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:54
Publisher:Huber
ISSN:0723-6557
Additional Information:

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