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Das Freiburger Streßpräventionstraining für Paare (FSPT): Selbstwahrgenommene Verbesserungen innerhalb von 6 Monate


Bodenmann, Guy; Widmer, Kathrin; Cina, Annette (1999). Das Freiburger Streßpräventionstraining für Paare (FSPT): Selbstwahrgenommene Verbesserungen innerhalb von 6 Monate. Verhaltenstherapie, 9(2):87-94.

Abstract

The Couples Coping Enhancement Training (CCET) represents a novel preventive approach for couples focusing on the enhancement of relevant skills which predict a better course of the relationship and a lower risk for divorce. Marital and stress research have shown that particularly four competencies act as important resources: (a) communication skills, (b) problem-solving capacities, (c) adequate individual stress management, and (d) dyadic coping competencies. Thus, these findings suggest to teach couples such competencies at a relatively early stage in their relationship. Whereas several preventive trainings for couples focusing on marital communication already exist, the CCET is new in that it primarily focuses on the coping skills of couples. The rationale of our approach is to strengthen marriage by better managing everyday stress. As several studies reveal, stress is an important negative factor for close relationships and gradually destroys marriage over time. The effectiveness of the CCET is evaluated in this article in regard to the subjective appraisals of changes of (a) the relevant skills and (b) the marriage in general within six months. The results reveal that couples who participated in the CCET report a significant better improvement of their relationship, whereas the couples of the control group do not. Thus, the effectiveness of this new preventive training could be established within six months.

Abstract

The Couples Coping Enhancement Training (CCET) represents a novel preventive approach for couples focusing on the enhancement of relevant skills which predict a better course of the relationship and a lower risk for divorce. Marital and stress research have shown that particularly four competencies act as important resources: (a) communication skills, (b) problem-solving capacities, (c) adequate individual stress management, and (d) dyadic coping competencies. Thus, these findings suggest to teach couples such competencies at a relatively early stage in their relationship. Whereas several preventive trainings for couples focusing on marital communication already exist, the CCET is new in that it primarily focuses on the coping skills of couples. The rationale of our approach is to strengthen marriage by better managing everyday stress. As several studies reveal, stress is an important negative factor for close relationships and gradually destroys marriage over time. The effectiveness of the CCET is evaluated in this article in regard to the subjective appraisals of changes of (a) the relevant skills and (b) the marriage in general within six months. The results reveal that couples who participated in the CCET report a significant better improvement of their relationship, whereas the couples of the control group do not. Thus, the effectiveness of this new preventive training could be established within six months.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:The couples coping enhancement training: Subjective appraisals of changes within six months
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:German
Date:1999
Deposited On:27 Jul 2012 08:58
Last Modified:20 Feb 2018 07:45
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:1016-6262
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000030682

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