Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

12-Month color stability of enamel, dentine, and enamel-dentine samples after bleaching


Wiegand, Annette; Drebenstedt, S; Roos, Malgorzata; Magalhães, A C; Attin, Thomas (2008). 12-Month color stability of enamel, dentine, and enamel-dentine samples after bleaching. Clinical Oral Investigations, 12(4):303-310.

Abstract

The study aimed to quantify the color regression of enamel (E), dentine (D), and combined enamel-dentine (ED) of differently bleached ED specimens over a period of 12 months in vitro. Two ED samples were obtained from the labial surfaces of bovine teeth and prepared to a standardized thickness with the enamel and dentine layer each 1 mm. The ED samples were distributed on four groups (each n = 80), in which the different bleaching products were applied on enamel (1, Whitestrips; 2, Illuminé 15%; 3, Opalescence Xtra Boost) or dentine surfaces (4, mixture of sodium perborate/distilled water). Eighty ED samples were not bleached (control). Color (L*a*b*) of ED was assessed at baseline, subsequently after bleaching and at 3, 6, and 12 months of storage after bleaching (each 20 samples/group). E and D samples were prepared by removing the dentine or enamel layer of ED samples to allow for separate color analysis. Bleaching resulted in a significant color change (DeltaE) of ED specimens. Within the observation period, DeltaL but not Deltab declined to baseline. L* values of E and D samples also declined and were not significantly different from control samples after 12 months, while b* values did not decrease to baseline. Generally, no differences between the bleaching agents could be observed. Color change of enamel, dentine, and combined ED of in vitro bleached tooth samples is not stable over time with regard to lightness. However, yellowness did not return to baseline within 1 year.

Abstract

The study aimed to quantify the color regression of enamel (E), dentine (D), and combined enamel-dentine (ED) of differently bleached ED specimens over a period of 12 months in vitro. Two ED samples were obtained from the labial surfaces of bovine teeth and prepared to a standardized thickness with the enamel and dentine layer each 1 mm. The ED samples were distributed on four groups (each n = 80), in which the different bleaching products were applied on enamel (1, Whitestrips; 2, Illuminé 15%; 3, Opalescence Xtra Boost) or dentine surfaces (4, mixture of sodium perborate/distilled water). Eighty ED samples were not bleached (control). Color (L*a*b*) of ED was assessed at baseline, subsequently after bleaching and at 3, 6, and 12 months of storage after bleaching (each 20 samples/group). E and D samples were prepared by removing the dentine or enamel layer of ED samples to allow for separate color analysis. Bleaching resulted in a significant color change (DeltaE) of ED specimens. Within the observation period, DeltaL but not Deltab declined to baseline. L* values of E and D samples also declined and were not significantly different from control samples after 12 months, while b* values did not decrease to baseline. Generally, no differences between the bleaching agents could be observed. Color change of enamel, dentine, and combined ED of in vitro bleached tooth samples is not stable over time with regard to lightness. However, yellowness did not return to baseline within 1 year.

Statistics

Citations

17 citations in Web of Science®
23 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

179 downloads since deposited on 12 Dec 2008
5 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Preventive Dentistry, Periodontology and Cariology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:December 2008
Deposited On:12 Dec 2008 15:16
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:37
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1432-6981
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00784-008-0195-7
PubMed ID:18369668

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations