Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Coronary artery calcium scoring: Influence of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction using 64-MDCT


Gebhard, Cathérine; Fiechter, Michael; Fuchs, Tobias A; Ghadri, Jelena R; Herzog, Bernhard A; Kuhn, Felix; Stehli, Julia; Müller, Ennio; Kazakauskaite, Egle; Gaemperli, Oliver; Kaufmann, Philipp A (2013). Coronary artery calcium scoring: Influence of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction using 64-MDCT. International Journal of Cardiology, 167(6):2932-2937.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Assessment of coronary artery calcification is increasingly used for cardiovascular risk stratification. We evaluated the reliability of calcium-scoring results using a novel iterative reconstruction algorithm (ASIR) on a high-definition 64-slice CT scanner, as such data is lacking. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 50 consecutive patients Agatston scores, calcium mass and volume score were assessed. Comparisons were performed between groups using filtered back projection (FBP) and 20-100% ASIR algorithms. Calcium score was measured in the coronary arteries, signal and noise were measured in the aortic root and left ventricle. In comparison with FBP, use of 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% ASIR resulted in reduced image noise between groups (7.7%, 18.8%, 27.9%, 39.86%, and 48.56%, respectively; p<0.001) without difference in signal (p=0.60). With ASIR algorithms Agatston coronary calcium scoring significantly decreased compared with FBP algorithms (837.3±130.3; 802.2±124.9, 771.5±120.7; 744.7±116.8, 724.5±114.2, and 709.2±112.3 for 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% ASIR, respectively, p<0.001). Volumetric score decreased in a similar manner (p<0.001) while calcium mass remained unchanged. Mean effective radiation dose was 0.81±0.08mSv. CONCLUSION: ASIR results in image noise reduction. However, ASIR image reconstruction techniques for HDCT scans decrease Agatston coronary calcium scores. Thus, one needs to be aware of significant changes of the scoring results caused by different reconstruction methods.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Assessment of coronary artery calcification is increasingly used for cardiovascular risk stratification. We evaluated the reliability of calcium-scoring results using a novel iterative reconstruction algorithm (ASIR) on a high-definition 64-slice CT scanner, as such data is lacking. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 50 consecutive patients Agatston scores, calcium mass and volume score were assessed. Comparisons were performed between groups using filtered back projection (FBP) and 20-100% ASIR algorithms. Calcium score was measured in the coronary arteries, signal and noise were measured in the aortic root and left ventricle. In comparison with FBP, use of 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% ASIR resulted in reduced image noise between groups (7.7%, 18.8%, 27.9%, 39.86%, and 48.56%, respectively; p<0.001) without difference in signal (p=0.60). With ASIR algorithms Agatston coronary calcium scoring significantly decreased compared with FBP algorithms (837.3±130.3; 802.2±124.9, 771.5±120.7; 744.7±116.8, 724.5±114.2, and 709.2±112.3 for 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% ASIR, respectively, p<0.001). Volumetric score decreased in a similar manner (p<0.001) while calcium mass remained unchanged. Mean effective radiation dose was 0.81±0.08mSv. CONCLUSION: ASIR results in image noise reduction. However, ASIR image reconstruction techniques for HDCT scans decrease Agatston coronary calcium scores. Thus, one needs to be aware of significant changes of the scoring results caused by different reconstruction methods.

Statistics

Citations

31 citations in Web of Science®
24 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nuclear Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:04 Feb 2013 08:35
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:57
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0167-5273
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2012.08.003
PubMed ID:22959869

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher