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Physicians' knowledge and continuing medical education regarding fitness to drive: a questionnaire-based survey in Southeast Switzerland


Pfäffli, Matthias; Thali, Michael J; Eggert, Sebastian (2012). Physicians' knowledge and continuing medical education regarding fitness to drive: a questionnaire-based survey in Southeast Switzerland. International Journal of Legal Medicine, 126(3):357-362.

Abstract

Valid information for physicians in Switzerland concerning knowledge and continuing education in traffic medicine is not available. Also, their attitude to the legally prescribed periodic driving fitness examinations is unclear. In order to gain more information about these topics, 635 resident physicians in Southeast Switzerland were sent a questionnaire (response rate 52%). In a self-estimation, 79% of the queried physicians claimed to know the minimal medical requirements for drivers which are important in their specialty. Statistically significant differences existed between the specialties, whereby general practitioners most frequently claimed to know the minimal medical requirements (90%). It appears that the minimal medical requirements for drivers are well known to the queried physicians. Fifty-two percent of the physicians favored an expansion of continuing education in traffic medicine. Such an expansion was desired to a lesser extent by physicians without knowledge of the minimal requirements (p < 0.001). A clear majority of the medical professionals adjudged the legally prescribed periodic driving fitness examinations as being an expedient means to identify unfit drivers. A national standardized form for reporting potentially unfit drivers to the licensing authorities was supported by 68% of the responding physicians. Such a form could simplify and standardize the reports to the licensing authorities.

Abstract

Valid information for physicians in Switzerland concerning knowledge and continuing education in traffic medicine is not available. Also, their attitude to the legally prescribed periodic driving fitness examinations is unclear. In order to gain more information about these topics, 635 resident physicians in Southeast Switzerland were sent a questionnaire (response rate 52%). In a self-estimation, 79% of the queried physicians claimed to know the minimal medical requirements for drivers which are important in their specialty. Statistically significant differences existed between the specialties, whereby general practitioners most frequently claimed to know the minimal medical requirements (90%). It appears that the minimal medical requirements for drivers are well known to the queried physicians. Fifty-two percent of the physicians favored an expansion of continuing education in traffic medicine. Such an expansion was desired to a lesser extent by physicians without knowledge of the minimal requirements (p < 0.001). A clear majority of the medical professionals adjudged the legally prescribed periodic driving fitness examinations as being an expedient means to identify unfit drivers. A national standardized form for reporting potentially unfit drivers to the licensing authorities was supported by 68% of the responding physicians. Such a form could simplify and standardize the reports to the licensing authorities.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Legal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:340 Law
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:20 Sep 2012 12:59
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:57
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0937-9827
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00414-011-0637-7
PubMed ID:22012301

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