Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Magnetic resonance imaging features of large endolymphatic sac compartments: audiological and clinical correlates


Connor, S E J; Siddiqui, A; O'Gorman, R L; Tysome, J R; Lee, A; Jiang, D; Fitzgerald-O'Connor, A (2012). Magnetic resonance imaging features of large endolymphatic sac compartments: audiological and clinical correlates. Journal of Laryngology and Otology, 126(6):586-593.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: (1) To study the prevalence and characteristics of large endolymphatic sac internal compartments on thin-section T2- and T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and to relate these to other large endolymphatic sac magnetic resonance imaging features, and (2) to correlate the compartment imaging features, endolymphatic sac size and labyrinthine anomalies with the patients' clinical and audiological data. METHOD: Magnetic resonance imaging studies for 38 patients with large endolymphatic sac anomalies were retrospectively reviewed in a tertiary referral centre. Endolymphatic sac compartment presence, morphology and imaging signal were assessed. Endolymphatic sac size and labyrinthine anomalies were also recorded. Endolymphatic sac compartments and other imaging features were correlated with clinical and audiological data. RESULTS: Compartments were present in 57 per cent of the imaged endolymphatic sacs, but their presence alone did not correlate with other imaging features or clinical data. The endolymphatic sac : internal auditory meatus signal ratio was associated with a history of sudden or fluctuating hearing loss. Hearing loss correlated with opercular and extraosseous endolymphatic sac size measurements. A larger midpoint intraosseous endolymphatic sac size was associated with clear fluid loss at cochlear implantation. CONCLUSION: The magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of large endolymphatic sac compartments have been defined. The endolymphatic sac size and distal compartment signal should be recorded, as these provide prognostic information and assist the planning of appropriate interventions.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: (1) To study the prevalence and characteristics of large endolymphatic sac internal compartments on thin-section T2- and T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and to relate these to other large endolymphatic sac magnetic resonance imaging features, and (2) to correlate the compartment imaging features, endolymphatic sac size and labyrinthine anomalies with the patients' clinical and audiological data. METHOD: Magnetic resonance imaging studies for 38 patients with large endolymphatic sac anomalies were retrospectively reviewed in a tertiary referral centre. Endolymphatic sac compartment presence, morphology and imaging signal were assessed. Endolymphatic sac size and labyrinthine anomalies were also recorded. Endolymphatic sac compartments and other imaging features were correlated with clinical and audiological data. RESULTS: Compartments were present in 57 per cent of the imaged endolymphatic sacs, but their presence alone did not correlate with other imaging features or clinical data. The endolymphatic sac : internal auditory meatus signal ratio was associated with a history of sudden or fluctuating hearing loss. Hearing loss correlated with opercular and extraosseous endolymphatic sac size measurements. A larger midpoint intraosseous endolymphatic sac size was associated with clear fluid loss at cochlear implantation. CONCLUSION: The magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of large endolymphatic sac compartments have been defined. The endolymphatic sac size and distal compartment signal should be recorded, as these provide prognostic information and assist the planning of appropriate interventions.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Downloads

146 downloads since deposited on 04 Dec 2012
12 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:June 2012
Deposited On:04 Dec 2012 13:39
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:58
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:0022-2151
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1017/S0022215112000606
PubMed ID:22643203

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations