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Non-invasive diagnosis of lung tuberculosis in children by single voxel ¹H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy


Santy, Ky; Nan, Phang; Chantana, Yay; Laurent, Denis; Scheer, Ianina; Steinmann, Beat; Nadal, David; Richner, Beat (2012). Non-invasive diagnosis of lung tuberculosis in children by single voxel ¹H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. European Journal of Pediatrics, 171(8):1257-1263.

Abstract

Our previous study showed that (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) can detect lipid peaks characteristic for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in cerebral lesions of young children; therefore, we aimed to extend and validate the application of (1)H-MRS for the diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis lesions in three adolescent patients. Here, we document lipid peaks characteristic for M. tuberculosis infection by (1)H-MRS from lung tissue surrounding lung cavities of two patients whose sputum samples were positive for acid-fast bacilli by microscopy and positive for M. tuberculosis by genetic testing, indicating active tuberculosis. A similar lipid peak was found also in the pleural effusion of a third patient with concurrent lung cavity compatible with active tuberculosis. However, in a patient with a pyogenic pulmonary abscess, (1)H-MRS of the drained pus displayed different characteristic peaks but no lipid peak at all. CONCLUSION: Our findings further validate (1)H-MRS as a rapid, non-invasive, and specific diagnostic tool for active tuberculosis in children with microbiologically documented infection outside the central nervous system, specifically in the lungs.

Abstract

Our previous study showed that (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) can detect lipid peaks characteristic for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in cerebral lesions of young children; therefore, we aimed to extend and validate the application of (1)H-MRS for the diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis lesions in three adolescent patients. Here, we document lipid peaks characteristic for M. tuberculosis infection by (1)H-MRS from lung tissue surrounding lung cavities of two patients whose sputum samples were positive for acid-fast bacilli by microscopy and positive for M. tuberculosis by genetic testing, indicating active tuberculosis. A similar lipid peak was found also in the pleural effusion of a third patient with concurrent lung cavity compatible with active tuberculosis. However, in a patient with a pyogenic pulmonary abscess, (1)H-MRS of the drained pus displayed different characteristic peaks but no lipid peak at all. CONCLUSION: Our findings further validate (1)H-MRS as a rapid, non-invasive, and specific diagnostic tool for active tuberculosis in children with microbiologically documented infection outside the central nervous system, specifically in the lungs.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:02 Oct 2012 14:03
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:58
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0340-6199
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00431-012-1768-7
PubMed ID:22772834

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