Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The expression of leucine-rich repeat gene family members in colorectal cancer


Piepoli, Ada; Palmieri, Orazio; Maglietta, Rosalia; Panza, Anna; Cattaneo, Elisa; Latiano, Anna; Laczko, Endre; Gentile, Annamaria; Carella, Massimo; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Ancona, Nicola; Marra, Giancarlo; Andriulli, Angelo (2012). The expression of leucine-rich repeat gene family members in colorectal cancer. Experimental Biology and Medicine, 237(10):1123-1128.

Abstract

This study was conducted to evaluate the association of the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene family with colorectal cancer (CRC). The expression of members of the LRR gene family were analyzed in 17 CRC specimens and in 59 healthy colorectal tissues by using Human Exon1.0ST microarray, and in 25 CRC specimens and 32 healthy colorectal tissues by U133Plus2.0 microarray. An association was found for 25 genes belonging to the plant-specific (PS) class of LRR genes (P = 0.05 for Exon1.0 ST and P = 0.04 for U133Plus2.0). In both data-sets, in CRC, we found down-regulation of SHOC2 (P < 0.00003) and LRRC28 (P < 0.01) and up-regulation of LRSAM1 (P < 0.000001), while up-regulation of MFHAS1 (P = 0.0005) and down-regulation of WDFY3 (P = 0.026) were found only in the Exon1.0 ST data-set. The PS LLR gene class encodes proteins that activate immune cells and might play a key role in programmed cell death and autophagy. SHOC2 and LRRC28 genes involved in RAS-mediated signaling, which hinders nutrient deprivation-induced autophagy, might be a possible link between the negative control of autophagy and tumorigenesis.

Abstract

This study was conducted to evaluate the association of the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene family with colorectal cancer (CRC). The expression of members of the LRR gene family were analyzed in 17 CRC specimens and in 59 healthy colorectal tissues by using Human Exon1.0ST microarray, and in 25 CRC specimens and 32 healthy colorectal tissues by U133Plus2.0 microarray. An association was found for 25 genes belonging to the plant-specific (PS) class of LRR genes (P = 0.05 for Exon1.0 ST and P = 0.04 for U133Plus2.0). In both data-sets, in CRC, we found down-regulation of SHOC2 (P < 0.00003) and LRRC28 (P < 0.01) and up-regulation of LRSAM1 (P < 0.000001), while up-regulation of MFHAS1 (P = 0.0005) and down-regulation of WDFY3 (P = 0.026) were found only in the Exon1.0 ST data-set. The PS LLR gene class encodes proteins that activate immune cells and might play a key role in programmed cell death and autophagy. SHOC2 and LRRC28 genes involved in RAS-mediated signaling, which hinders nutrient deprivation-induced autophagy, might be a possible link between the negative control of autophagy and tumorigenesis.

Statistics

Citations

5 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 18 Oct 2012
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research

04 Faculty of Medicine > Functional Genomics Center Zurich
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:18 Oct 2012 06:36
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:59
Publisher:Royal Society of Medicine Press
ISSN:1535-3699
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1258/ebm.2012.012042
PubMed ID:23045723

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 215kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations