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Hacking the Natural Habitat: An in-the-wild study of smart homes, their development, and the people who live in them


Mennicken, Sarah; Huang, Elaine May (2012). Hacking the Natural Habitat: An in-the-wild study of smart homes, their development, and the people who live in them. In: Pervasive 2012, Newcastle, UK, 19 June 2012 - 22 June 2012, 143-160.

Abstract

Commercial home automation systems are becoming increasingly common, affording the opportunity to study technology-augmented homes in real world contexts. In order to understand how these technologies are being integrated into homes and their effects on inhabitants, we conducted a qualitative study involving smart home professionals who provide such technology, people currently in the process of planning or building smart homes, and people currently living in smart homes. We identified motivations for bringing smart technology into homes, and the phases involved in making a home smart. We also explored the varied roles of the smart home inhabitants that emerged during these phases, and several of the challenges and benefits that arise while living in a smart home. Based on these findings we propose open areas and new directions for smart home research.

Abstract

Commercial home automation systems are becoming increasingly common, affording the opportunity to study technology-augmented homes in real world contexts. In order to understand how these technologies are being integrated into homes and their effects on inhabitants, we conducted a qualitative study involving smart home professionals who provide such technology, people currently in the process of planning or building smart homes, and people currently living in smart homes. We identified motivations for bringing smart technology into homes, and the phases involved in making a home smart. We also explored the varied roles of the smart home inhabitants that emerged during these phases, and several of the challenges and benefits that arise while living in a smart home. Based on these findings we propose open areas and new directions for smart home research.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Event End Date:22 June 2012
Deposited On:19 Oct 2012 11:51
Last Modified:13 Aug 2017 11:35
Publisher:Springer
Series Name:Lecture Notes in Computer Science
Number:7319/2012
ISSN:0302-9743
ISBN:978-3-642-31204-5
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-31205-2_10
Related URLs:http://pervasiveconference.org/2012/
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:6875

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