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Endocannabinoid-dependent plasticity at spinal nociceptor synapses


Kato, Ako; Punnakkal, Pradeep; Pernía-Andrade, Alejandro Javier; von Schoultz, Carolin; Sharopov, Salim; Nyilas, Rita; Katona, István; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich (2012). Endocannabinoid-dependent plasticity at spinal nociceptor synapses. Journal of Physiology, 590(Pt 19):4717-4733.

Abstract

Key points  Synaptic plasticity between primary nociceptors and second order dorsal horn neurons serves key roles in pain and analgesia  A contribution of NMDA receptors to long-term potentiation and long-term depression at these synapses has been demonstrated before, but much less is known about a possible role of endocannabinoids and cannabinoid (CB)(1) receptors.  Here we show that CB(1) receptors residing on the spinal terminals of primary nociceptors critically contribute to an NMDA receptor-independent form of long-term depression at these synapses, which requires simultaneous pre- and postsynaptic activity.  A similar long-lasting depression of nociceptive signal transmission can also be obtained with application of CB(1) receptor agonists in the presence of presynaptic stimulation alone.  These findings identify a previously unknown form of long-term depression at spinal nociceptor synapses, which may be important for our understanding of pain-related neural plasticity and analgesic actions of CB(1) receptor agonists.

Abstract

Key points  Synaptic plasticity between primary nociceptors and second order dorsal horn neurons serves key roles in pain and analgesia  A contribution of NMDA receptors to long-term potentiation and long-term depression at these synapses has been demonstrated before, but much less is known about a possible role of endocannabinoids and cannabinoid (CB)(1) receptors.  Here we show that CB(1) receptors residing on the spinal terminals of primary nociceptors critically contribute to an NMDA receptor-independent form of long-term depression at these synapses, which requires simultaneous pre- and postsynaptic activity.  A similar long-lasting depression of nociceptive signal transmission can also be obtained with application of CB(1) receptor agonists in the presence of presynaptic stimulation alone.  These findings identify a previously unknown form of long-term depression at spinal nociceptor synapses, which may be important for our understanding of pain-related neural plasticity and analgesic actions of CB(1) receptor agonists.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 October 2012
Deposited On:24 Oct 2012 13:29
Last Modified:16 Feb 2018 23:58
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0022-3751
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2012.234229
PubMed ID:22826132

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