Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Anions or cations: Who is in charge of inhibiting the nickel(II) promoted B- to Z-DNA transition?


Spingler, Bernhard (2005). Anions or cations: Who is in charge of inhibiting the nickel(II) promoted B- to Z-DNA transition? Inorganic Chemistry, 44(4):831-833.

Abstract

Various weakly binding cations and anions were studied at a concentration of 10 mM to ascertain their interaction with the nickel(II) promoted B- to Z-DNA transition of poly d(GC). These salts were ranked according to the decreasing amounts of nickel needed for the B- to Z-DNA transition and provided the following order: NaCl approximate to Me4NCl > LiCl much greater than MgCl2 > no salt > NaBF4 approximate to NaNO3 approximate to NaClO4. Remarkably, it was found that going from sodium nitrate to sodium chloride increased the necessary amount of nickel to induce the transition to the left-handed helix of poly d(GC) by a factor of 10. This dramatic effect cannot be explained by the binding constant of nickel(II) to chloride to form the monocationic complex. We believe that this is the first reported example of the role of chloride anions, which appear to modulate the interaction of nickel(II) ions with the polyanionic DNA.

Abstract

Various weakly binding cations and anions were studied at a concentration of 10 mM to ascertain their interaction with the nickel(II) promoted B- to Z-DNA transition of poly d(GC). These salts were ranked according to the decreasing amounts of nickel needed for the B- to Z-DNA transition and provided the following order: NaCl approximate to Me4NCl > LiCl much greater than MgCl2 > no salt > NaBF4 approximate to NaNO3 approximate to NaClO4. Remarkably, it was found that going from sodium nitrate to sodium chloride increased the necessary amount of nickel to induce the transition to the left-handed helix of poly d(GC) by a factor of 10. This dramatic effect cannot be explained by the binding constant of nickel(II) to chloride to form the monocationic complex. We believe that this is the first reported example of the role of chloride anions, which appear to modulate the interaction of nickel(II) ions with the polyanionic DNA.

Statistics

Citations

19 citations in Web of Science®
18 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 23 Oct 2012
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:February 2005
Deposited On:23 Oct 2012 14:01
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 15:39
Publisher:American Chemical Society
ISSN:0020-1669
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1021/ic048760o
Other Identification Number:ISI:000227172200015

Download