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Discriminating individually considerate and authoritarian leaders by speech activity cues


Feese, Sebastian; Muaremi, Amir; Arnrich, Bert; Tröster, Gerhard; Meyer, Bertolt; Jonas, Klaus (2011). Discriminating individually considerate and authoritarian leaders by speech activity cues. In: Third IEEE International Conference on Social Computing: International Workshop on Social Behavioral Analysis and Behavioral Change (SBABC11), Boston, 9 October 2011 - 11 October 2011, 1-6.

Abstract

Effective leadership can increase team performance, however up to now the influence of specific micro-level behavioral
patterns on team performance is unclear. At the same time,
current behavior observation methods in social psychology mostly rely on manual video annotations that impede research. In our work, we follow a sensor-based approach to automatically extract speech activity cues to discriminate individualized considerate from authoritarian leadership. On a subset of 35 selected group discussions lead by leaders of different styles, we predict leadership style with 75.5% accuracy using logistic regression.
We find that leadership style predictability is dependent on the relative discussion time and is highest for the middle parts of the discussions. Analysis of regression coefficients suggests that individually considerate leaders start speaking more often while others speak, use short utterances more often, change their speech loudness more and speak less than authoritarian leaders.

Abstract

Effective leadership can increase team performance, however up to now the influence of specific micro-level behavioral
patterns on team performance is unclear. At the same time,
current behavior observation methods in social psychology mostly rely on manual video annotations that impede research. In our work, we follow a sensor-based approach to automatically extract speech activity cues to discriminate individualized considerate from authoritarian leadership. On a subset of 35 selected group discussions lead by leaders of different styles, we predict leadership style with 75.5% accuracy using logistic regression.
We find that leadership style predictability is dependent on the relative discussion time and is highest for the middle parts of the discussions. Analysis of regression coefficients suggests that individually considerate leaders start speaking more often while others speak, use short utterances more often, change their speech loudness more and speak less than authoritarian leaders.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Event End Date:11 October 2011
Deposited On:23 Oct 2012 14:32
Last Modified:13 Aug 2017 11:27
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://dms.ife.ee.ethz.ch/index.php/publications/show/2286

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