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Changing contexts of youth development: an overview of recent social trends and a psychological model


Tomasik, Martin J; Pavlova, Maria K; Lechner, Clemens M; Blumenthal, Anja; Körner, Astrid (2012). Changing contexts of youth development: an overview of recent social trends and a psychological model. New Directions for Youth Development, 2012(135):27-38.

Abstract

Developmental contexts play a pivotal role in shaping the psychosocial adaptation and development of young people. Family, school, peer groups, and community provide the opportunities and constraints for the attainment of major developmental tasks of adolescence, and changing relations between the individual and these contexts constitute the basic process of human development. Furthermore, it is primarily through these immediate developmental contexts (microsystems in terms of ecological systems theory) that macrolevel trends such as globalization influence youth development. In this article, we illustrate how globalization and economic change have been reshaping the central microcontexts of adolescence. We then argue that the individual differences in the way youth perceive these changes and cope with themthat is, the active role individuals play in their own development - are the key to understanding the psychological consequences of social change.

Abstract

Developmental contexts play a pivotal role in shaping the psychosocial adaptation and development of young people. Family, school, peer groups, and community provide the opportunities and constraints for the attainment of major developmental tasks of adolescence, and changing relations between the individual and these contexts constitute the basic process of human development. Furthermore, it is primarily through these immediate developmental contexts (microsystems in terms of ecological systems theory) that macrolevel trends such as globalization influence youth development. In this article, we illustrate how globalization and economic change have been reshaping the central microcontexts of adolescence. We then argue that the individual differences in the way youth perceive these changes and cope with themthat is, the active role individuals play in their own development - are the key to understanding the psychological consequences of social change.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:26 Oct 2012 14:39
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 15:49
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
Series Name:New Directions for Youth Development
ISSN:1533-8916
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/yd.20026
Official URL:http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/yd.20026/abstract
PubMed ID:23097361

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