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Neural correlates of posttraumatic growth after severe motor vehicle accidents


Rabe, Sirko; Zöllner, Tanja; Maercker, Andreas; Karl, Anke (2006). Neural correlates of posttraumatic growth after severe motor vehicle accidents. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 74(5):880-886.

Abstract

Frontal brain asymmetry has been associated with emotion- and motivation-related constructs. The authors examined the relationship between frontal brain asymmetry and subjective perception of posttraumatic growth (PTG) after severe motor vehicle accidents (MVAs). Eighty-two survivors of MVAs completed self-report measures of PTG, trait and state affect, and diagnostic interviews assessing clinical status, and underwent measurement of resting electroencephalographic activity. As predicted, increased relative left frontal activation was significantly related to PTG, even when statistically controlling for dispositional positive affect. The authors assume that approach-related motivational tendencies associated with higher relative left frontal brain activity may be involved in the process and outcome of PTG.

Abstract

Frontal brain asymmetry has been associated with emotion- and motivation-related constructs. The authors examined the relationship between frontal brain asymmetry and subjective perception of posttraumatic growth (PTG) after severe motor vehicle accidents (MVAs). Eighty-two survivors of MVAs completed self-report measures of PTG, trait and state affect, and diagnostic interviews assessing clinical status, and underwent measurement of resting electroencephalographic activity. As predicted, increased relative left frontal activation was significantly related to PTG, even when statistically controlling for dispositional positive affect. The authors assume that approach-related motivational tendencies associated with higher relative left frontal brain activity may be involved in the process and outcome of PTG.

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35 citations in Web of Science®
39 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2006
Deposited On:13 Nov 2012 15:54
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 15:57
Publisher:American Psychological Association
ISSN:0022-006X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-006X.74.5.880
PubMed ID:17032092

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