Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Social acknowledgment as a victim or survivor: a scale to measure a recovery factor of PTSD


Maercker, Andreas; Müller, Julia (2004). Social acknowledgment as a victim or survivor: a scale to measure a recovery factor of PTSD. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 17(4):345-351.

Abstract

The development and validation of a new measure of social acknowledgment as a victim or survivor is presented, whose items were derived from previous research on social recovery factors of post-traumatic stress disorder. The Social Acknowledgment Questionnaire (SAQ) was administered to nontreatment seeking traumatized persons--178 former political prisoners in East Germany and 151 recently traumatized interpersonal crime victims. Principal components analysis yielded three factors--Recognition as victim, General disapproval, and Family disapproval. The factors showed high internal consistency and good test-retest reliability; correlated moderately to strong with measures of PTSD severity, social support, and reluctance to talk about the trauma. In comparison to a conventional measure of social support, the SAQ predicted comparably better between persons with high- and low-PTSD severity.

Abstract

The development and validation of a new measure of social acknowledgment as a victim or survivor is presented, whose items were derived from previous research on social recovery factors of post-traumatic stress disorder. The Social Acknowledgment Questionnaire (SAQ) was administered to nontreatment seeking traumatized persons--178 former political prisoners in East Germany and 151 recently traumatized interpersonal crime victims. Principal components analysis yielded three factors--Recognition as victim, General disapproval, and Family disapproval. The factors showed high internal consistency and good test-retest reliability; correlated moderately to strong with measures of PTSD severity, social support, and reluctance to talk about the trauma. In comparison to a conventional measure of social support, the SAQ predicted comparably better between persons with high- and low-PTSD severity.

Statistics

Citations

61 citations in Web of Science®
75 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2004
Deposited On:31 Oct 2012 14:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:02
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0894-9867
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1023/B:JOTS.0000038484.15488.3d
PubMed ID:15462543

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher