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Long-term effects of the Dresden bombing: relationships to control beliefs, religious belief, and personal growth


Maercker, Andreas; Herrle, Johannes (2003). Long-term effects of the Dresden bombing: relationships to control beliefs, religious belief, and personal growth. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 16(6):579-87.

Abstract

Aftereffects of the Dresden bombing of February 1945 on 47 survivors were investigated using a comprehensive framework of trauma sequelae including pathogenetic, salutogenetic, and further mediating or moderating variables. A relatively low rate of PTSD symptomatology was noted. Traumatic exposure was related to current PTSD symptoms and to personal growth, with no systematic relationships between the 2 outcome variables. PTSD symptoms were primarily related to external control, whereas personal growth was primarily associated with internal control. Religious belief in the afterlife moderated effects between exposure and posttraumatic avoidance or personal growth. Furthermore, belonging to particular age groups at traumatization (adolescents, middle-aged adults) was associated with increased posttraumatic intrusions at the time of data collection.

Abstract

Aftereffects of the Dresden bombing of February 1945 on 47 survivors were investigated using a comprehensive framework of trauma sequelae including pathogenetic, salutogenetic, and further mediating or moderating variables. A relatively low rate of PTSD symptomatology was noted. Traumatic exposure was related to current PTSD symptoms and to personal growth, with no systematic relationships between the 2 outcome variables. PTSD symptoms were primarily related to external control, whereas personal growth was primarily associated with internal control. Religious belief in the afterlife moderated effects between exposure and posttraumatic avoidance or personal growth. Furthermore, belonging to particular age groups at traumatization (adolescents, middle-aged adults) was associated with increased posttraumatic intrusions at the time of data collection.

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48 citations in Web of Science®
65 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2003
Deposited On:31 Oct 2012 10:43
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:02
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0894-9867
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1023/B:JOTS.0000004083.41502.2d
PubMed ID:14690356

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