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Impact of beta-amyloid-specific florbetaben PET imaging on confidence in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease


Schipke, C G; Peters, O; Heuser, I; Grimmer, T; Sabbagh, M N; Sabri, O; Hock, C; Kunz, M; Kuhlmann, J; Reininger, C; Blankenburg, M (2012). Impact of beta-amyloid-specific florbetaben PET imaging on confidence in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, 33(6):416-422.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) may be corroborated by imaging of beta-amyloid plaques using positron emission tomography (PET). Here, we performed an add-on questionnaire study to evaluate the relevance of florbetaben imaging (BAY 949172) in diagnosis and consecutive management of probable AD patients.
METHODS: AD patients with a clinical diagnosis in accordance with the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria or controls were imaged using florbetaben. Referring physicians were asked on a voluntary basis about their confidence in initial diagnosis, significance of PET imaging results, and their anticipated consequences for future patient care.
RESULTS: 121 questionnaires for probable AD patients and 80 questionnaires for controls were evaluated. In 18% of patients who had initially received the diagnosis of probable AD, PET scans were rated negative, whereas in controls 18% of scans were positive. An increase in confidence in the initial diagnosis was frequently reported (80%). Imaging results had a significant impact on the intended patient care, as judged by the referring physicians; this was most prominent in those patients with a contradicting scan and/or a low confidence in the initial diagnosis.
CONCLUSION: Florbetaben amyloid imaging increases the overall confidence in diagnosis of AD and may frequently influence clinical decisions and patient management.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) may be corroborated by imaging of beta-amyloid plaques using positron emission tomography (PET). Here, we performed an add-on questionnaire study to evaluate the relevance of florbetaben imaging (BAY 949172) in diagnosis and consecutive management of probable AD patients.
METHODS: AD patients with a clinical diagnosis in accordance with the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria or controls were imaged using florbetaben. Referring physicians were asked on a voluntary basis about their confidence in initial diagnosis, significance of PET imaging results, and their anticipated consequences for future patient care.
RESULTS: 121 questionnaires for probable AD patients and 80 questionnaires for controls were evaluated. In 18% of patients who had initially received the diagnosis of probable AD, PET scans were rated negative, whereas in controls 18% of scans were positive. An increase in confidence in the initial diagnosis was frequently reported (80%). Imaging results had a significant impact on the intended patient care, as judged by the referring physicians; this was most prominent in those patients with a contradicting scan and/or a low confidence in the initial diagnosis.
CONCLUSION: Florbetaben amyloid imaging increases the overall confidence in diagnosis of AD and may frequently influence clinical decisions and patient management.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute for Regenerative Medicine (IREM)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:14 Nov 2012 13:57
Last Modified:16 Aug 2016 10:12
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:1420-8008
Additional Information:© 2012 S. Karger AG
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000339367
PubMed ID:22814208

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