Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Thalamocortical theta coherence in neurological patients at rest and during a working memory task


Sarnthein, J; Morel, A; von Stein, A; Jeanmonod, D (2005). Thalamocortical theta coherence in neurological patients at rest and during a working memory task. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 57(2):87-96.

Abstract

We simultaneously recorded the local field potential (LFP) in the thalamus and the electroencephalogram (EEG) on the scalp of 5 patients suffering from neurogenic pain, epilepsy and movement disorders. In an earlier study [], we have investigated the slowing of EEG and the high thalamocortical coherence in the framework of thalamocortical dysrhythmia, the common underlying pathophysiology. The current study focuses on the effects of different cognitive conditions. When patients rested with eyes closed, a theta peak dominated the EEG spectra. The peak height was reduced upon opening the eyes, reminiscent of the classical alpha blocking. This peak reduction also appeared in the thalamic LFP recording. When patients activated their working memory by counting backwards, the theta peak increased in scalp EEG or in the LFP recorded in thalamic nuclei VA/VL. The coherence estimates between EEG and LFP ranged between 21% and 76% for different patients and cognitive conditions (mean: 50%). The involvement of both cortex and thalamus in working memory and the high thalamocortical coherence underline, in addition to cortico-cortical interactions, the importance of thalamocortical modules in the generation of higher cognitive functions.

Abstract

We simultaneously recorded the local field potential (LFP) in the thalamus and the electroencephalogram (EEG) on the scalp of 5 patients suffering from neurogenic pain, epilepsy and movement disorders. In an earlier study [], we have investigated the slowing of EEG and the high thalamocortical coherence in the framework of thalamocortical dysrhythmia, the common underlying pathophysiology. The current study focuses on the effects of different cognitive conditions. When patients rested with eyes closed, a theta peak dominated the EEG spectra. The peak height was reduced upon opening the eyes, reminiscent of the classical alpha blocking. This peak reduction also appeared in the thalamic LFP recording. When patients activated their working memory by counting backwards, the theta peak increased in scalp EEG or in the LFP recorded in thalamic nuclei VA/VL. The coherence estimates between EEG and LFP ranged between 21% and 76% for different patients and cognitive conditions (mean: 50%). The involvement of both cortex and thalamus in working memory and the high thalamocortical coherence underline, in addition to cortico-cortical interactions, the importance of thalamocortical modules in the generation of higher cognitive functions.

Statistics

Citations

30 citations in Web of Science®
32 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

73 downloads since deposited on 08 Apr 2009
19 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2005
Deposited On:08 Apr 2009 14:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:38
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0167-8760
Additional Information:Elsevier - Full-text article
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2005.03.015
PubMed ID:15982767

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations