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The subjective side of cognition : on the development of non-cognitive variables influencing cognitive development across the adult lifespan


Mascherek, A. The subjective side of cognition : on the development of non-cognitive variables influencing cognitive development across the adult lifespan. 2011, University of Zurich, Faculty of Arts.

Abstract

The four studies summarized in the present thesis were conducted within the overarching framework of asking how and by which means individuals manage and influence their own cognitive development. Two aspects were addressed specifically: First, the development of individual differences in the extent to which individuals deliberately engage in cognitive activities and, hence, influence their own cognitive performance. Second, the development of individual differences in the metacognitive skill of subjectively estimating one's own cognitive performance and its potential influence on cognitive development. Following the elaboration of the theoretical background in chapter 1, in chapter 2, the following questions were addressed in detail: Are there age differences between young and old adults in Typical Intellectual Engagement? Are presumptive differences related to known age differences in related constructs? (Study 1). How does Typical Intellectual Engagement develop across five years in old age? Are there interindividual differences in the development of Typical Intellectual Engagement? (Study 2). Chapter 3 examines the accuracy of metacognitive subjective memory complaints in populations of individuals for whom the management of their lowered cognitive resources may be decisive for their everyday functioning (Study 3). In these populations of memory clinic outpatients the accuracy of complaints may be decisive to trigger extra-effort to ensure normal everyday functioning, because formerly highly automatized processes might then need deliberate effort and resource allocation. Due to that, the processes should be more salient in groups of outpatients and might, thus, be better assessable. In Study 4 the question whether the relation between subjective and objective cognitive performance is assessed more adequately by investigating commonalities in change was addressed. The empirical evidence of Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate substantial interindividual differences in Typical Intellectual Engagement that are not captured by ability measures or potentially related personality trait measures. Studies 3 and 4 reveal that cognitive complaints are more strongly related to specific cognitive domains than to global cognitive measures. Also, the relation between the constructs is higher when taking a change- oriented approach. However, overall, it remains moderate. In chapter 4, all findings are integrated in an overall discussion. Shortcomings of the present studies and theoretical implications are addressed. Suggestions for future research directions focusing on the functional relevance of cognitive abilities, metacognitve skills and intellectual engagement are made.

Abstract

The four studies summarized in the present thesis were conducted within the overarching framework of asking how and by which means individuals manage and influence their own cognitive development. Two aspects were addressed specifically: First, the development of individual differences in the extent to which individuals deliberately engage in cognitive activities and, hence, influence their own cognitive performance. Second, the development of individual differences in the metacognitive skill of subjectively estimating one's own cognitive performance and its potential influence on cognitive development. Following the elaboration of the theoretical background in chapter 1, in chapter 2, the following questions were addressed in detail: Are there age differences between young and old adults in Typical Intellectual Engagement? Are presumptive differences related to known age differences in related constructs? (Study 1). How does Typical Intellectual Engagement develop across five years in old age? Are there interindividual differences in the development of Typical Intellectual Engagement? (Study 2). Chapter 3 examines the accuracy of metacognitive subjective memory complaints in populations of individuals for whom the management of their lowered cognitive resources may be decisive for their everyday functioning (Study 3). In these populations of memory clinic outpatients the accuracy of complaints may be decisive to trigger extra-effort to ensure normal everyday functioning, because formerly highly automatized processes might then need deliberate effort and resource allocation. Due to that, the processes should be more salient in groups of outpatients and might, thus, be better assessable. In Study 4 the question whether the relation between subjective and objective cognitive performance is assessed more adequately by investigating commonalities in change was addressed. The empirical evidence of Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate substantial interindividual differences in Typical Intellectual Engagement that are not captured by ability measures or potentially related personality trait measures. Studies 3 and 4 reveal that cognitive complaints are more strongly related to specific cognitive domains than to global cognitive measures. Also, the relation between the constructs is higher when taking a change- oriented approach. However, overall, it remains moderate. In chapter 4, all findings are integrated in an overall discussion. Shortcomings of the present studies and theoretical implications are addressed. Suggestions for future research directions focusing on the functional relevance of cognitive abilities, metacognitve skills and intellectual engagement are made.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Dissertation
Referees:Zimprich D, Martin Mike
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2011
Deposited On:21 Nov 2012 15:38
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:06
Free access at:Related URL. An embargo period may apply.
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&CON_LNG=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=007344709

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