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Complete replacement of open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms by endovascular aneurysm repair: a two-center 14-year experience


Mayer, D; Aeschbacher, S; Pfammatter, T; Veith, F J; Norgren, L; Magnuson, A; Rancic, Z; Lachat, M; Larzon, T (2012). Complete replacement of open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms by endovascular aneurysm repair: a two-center 14-year experience. Annals of Surgery, 256(5):688-696.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: : To present the combined 14-year experience of 2 university centers performing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on 100% of noninfected ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAA) over the last 32 months.
BACKGROUND: : Endovascular aneurysm repair for RAAA feasibility is reported to be 20% to 50%, and EVAR for RAAA has been reported to have better outcomes than open repair.
METHODS: : We retrospectively analyzed prospectively gathered data on 473 consecutive RAAA patients (Zurich, 295; Örebro, 178) from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2011, treated by an "EVAR-whenever-possible" approach until April 2009 (EVAR/OPEN period) and thereafter according to a "100% EVAR" approach (EVAR-ONLY period).Straightforward cases were treated by standard EVAR. More complex RAAA were managed during EVAR-ONLY with adjunctive procedures in 17 of 70 patients (24%): chimney, 3; open iliac debranching, 1; coiling, 8; onyx, 3; and chimney plus onyx, 2.
RESULTS: : Since May 2009, all RAAA but one have been treated by EVAR (Zurich, 31; Örebro, 39); 30-day mortality for EVAR-ONLY was 24% (17 of 70). Total cohort mortality (including medically treated patients) for EVAR/OPEN was 32.8% (131 of 400) compared with 27.4% (20 of 73) for EVAR-ONLY (P = 0.376). During EVAR/OPEN, 10% (39 of 400) of patients were treated medically compared with 4% (3 of 73) of patients during EVAR-ONLY. In EVAR/OPEN, open repair showed a statistically significant association with 30-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-7.5; P = 0.004). For patients with no abdominal decompression, there was a higher mortality with open repair than EVAR (adjusted OR = 5.6; 95% CI, 1.9-16.7). In patients with abdominal decompression by laparotomy, there was no difference in mortality (adjusted OR = 1.1; 95% CI, 0.3-3.7).
CONCLUSIONS: : The "EVAR-ONLY" approach has allowed EVAR treatment of nearly all incoming RAAA with low mortality and turndown rates. Although the observed association of a higher EVAR mortality with abdominal decompression needs further study, our results support superiority and more widespread adoption of EVAR for the treatment of RAAA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: : To present the combined 14-year experience of 2 university centers performing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on 100% of noninfected ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAA) over the last 32 months.
BACKGROUND: : Endovascular aneurysm repair for RAAA feasibility is reported to be 20% to 50%, and EVAR for RAAA has been reported to have better outcomes than open repair.
METHODS: : We retrospectively analyzed prospectively gathered data on 473 consecutive RAAA patients (Zurich, 295; Örebro, 178) from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2011, treated by an "EVAR-whenever-possible" approach until April 2009 (EVAR/OPEN period) and thereafter according to a "100% EVAR" approach (EVAR-ONLY period).Straightforward cases were treated by standard EVAR. More complex RAAA were managed during EVAR-ONLY with adjunctive procedures in 17 of 70 patients (24%): chimney, 3; open iliac debranching, 1; coiling, 8; onyx, 3; and chimney plus onyx, 2.
RESULTS: : Since May 2009, all RAAA but one have been treated by EVAR (Zurich, 31; Örebro, 39); 30-day mortality for EVAR-ONLY was 24% (17 of 70). Total cohort mortality (including medically treated patients) for EVAR/OPEN was 32.8% (131 of 400) compared with 27.4% (20 of 73) for EVAR-ONLY (P = 0.376). During EVAR/OPEN, 10% (39 of 400) of patients were treated medically compared with 4% (3 of 73) of patients during EVAR-ONLY. In EVAR/OPEN, open repair showed a statistically significant association with 30-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-7.5; P = 0.004). For patients with no abdominal decompression, there was a higher mortality with open repair than EVAR (adjusted OR = 5.6; 95% CI, 1.9-16.7). In patients with abdominal decompression by laparotomy, there was no difference in mortality (adjusted OR = 1.1; 95% CI, 0.3-3.7).
CONCLUSIONS: : The "EVAR-ONLY" approach has allowed EVAR treatment of nearly all incoming RAAA with low mortality and turndown rates. Although the observed association of a higher EVAR mortality with abdominal decompression needs further study, our results support superiority and more widespread adoption of EVAR for the treatment of RAAA.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:30 Nov 2012 13:10
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:06
Publisher:Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0003-4932
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/SLA.0b013e318271cebd
PubMed ID:23095611

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