Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Multi-system neurorehabilitative strategies to restore motor functions following severe spinal cord injury


Musienko, P; Heutschi, J; Friedli, L; van den Brand, R; Courtine, G (2012). Multi-system neurorehabilitative strategies to restore motor functions following severe spinal cord injury. Experimental Neurology, 235(1):100-109.

Abstract

Severe spinal cord injury (SCI) permanently abolishes motor functions caudal to the lesion. However, the neuronal machinery sufficient to produce standing and stepping is located below most SCI, and can be reactivated with training. Therefore, why do rats and humans fail to regain significant levels of motor control after a severe SCI? In this review, we argue that the lack of sustainable excitability in locomotor circuitries after SCI prevents the emergence of functional motor states during training, thus limiting the occurrence of activity-dependent plasticity in paralyzed subjects. In turn, we show that spinal rats trained with combinations of epidural electrical stimulation and monoamine agonists, which promote locomotor permissive states during rehabilitation, can regain coordinated stepping with full weight bearing capacities in the total absence of supraspinal influences. This impressive recovery of function relies on the ability of spinal circuitries to utilize multisensory information as a source of control and learning after the loss of brain input. We finally discuss the implication of these findings for the design of multi-system neurorehabilitative interventions capable of restoring some degree of function in humans with severe SCI.

Abstract

Severe spinal cord injury (SCI) permanently abolishes motor functions caudal to the lesion. However, the neuronal machinery sufficient to produce standing and stepping is located below most SCI, and can be reactivated with training. Therefore, why do rats and humans fail to regain significant levels of motor control after a severe SCI? In this review, we argue that the lack of sustainable excitability in locomotor circuitries after SCI prevents the emergence of functional motor states during training, thus limiting the occurrence of activity-dependent plasticity in paralyzed subjects. In turn, we show that spinal rats trained with combinations of epidural electrical stimulation and monoamine agonists, which promote locomotor permissive states during rehabilitation, can regain coordinated stepping with full weight bearing capacities in the total absence of supraspinal influences. This impressive recovery of function relies on the ability of spinal circuitries to utilize multisensory information as a source of control and learning after the loss of brain input. We finally discuss the implication of these findings for the design of multi-system neurorehabilitative interventions capable of restoring some degree of function in humans with severe SCI.

Statistics

Citations

23 citations in Web of Science®
29 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 28 Nov 2012
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:28 Nov 2012 15:35
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:07
Publisher:Elsevier
Series Name:Experimental Neurology
ISSN:0014-4886
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.expneurol.2011.08.025
PubMed ID:21925172

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations