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Tooth discoloration induced by endodontic materials: a laboratory study


Lenherr, P; Allgayer, N; Weiger, R; Filippi, A; Attin, T; Krastl, G (2012). Tooth discoloration induced by endodontic materials: a laboratory study. International Endodontic Journal, 45(10):942-949.

Abstract

AIM: To investigate the discoloration potential of endodontic materials using a bovine tooth model. METHODOLOGY: Two hundred and 10 dentine-enamel cuboid blocks (10 × 10 × 3.5 mm) were prepared out of the middle thirds of bovine tooth crowns. Standardized cavities were prepared in the walls of the pulp chamber leaving 2 mm of enamel and dentine on the labial wall of the crown. The specimens were randomly assigned to 14 groups (n = 15). Endodontic materials were placed into the cavities as follows: group A: empty, group B: blood, group C: calcium hydroxide, group D: ApexCal, group E: Ultracal XS, group F: Ledermix, group G: triple antibiotic paste (3Mix), group H: grey MTA(GMTA), group I: GMTA + blood, group J: white MTA (WMTA), group K: WMTA + blood, group L: Portland cement (PC), group M: PC + blood and group N: AH Plus. The cavities were sealed with composite and stored in water. Standardized colour measurement (VITA Easyshade compact) was performed at the following intervals: prior to (T0) and after placement of the filling (T1), 1 week (T2), 1 month (T3), 3 months (T4), 6 months (T5) and after 1 year (T6). Colour change (ΔE) values were calculated. A two-way analysis of variance was used to assess significant differences between the endodontic materials. The mean values of all groups were compared using the Tukey multiple comparison test (α = 0.05). RESULTS: Significant differences were detected amongst the experimental groups after 12 months (P < 0.0001). The lowest colour change values were observed in the groups N (AH Plus, 3.2 ± 1.5), A (empty, 3.8 ± 1.4), L (PC, 4.1 ± 1.7), C (calcium hydroxide, 4.7 ± 1.5), E (Ultracal XS, 5.1 ± 1.9) and J (WMTA, 7.9 ± 6.7). The most discoloration was measured in groups G (3Mix, 66.2 ± 9.9) and F (Ledermix, 46.2 ± 11.6). PC showed the best colour stability amongst the Portland cement-based materials; however, when contaminated with blood (group M), a significantly higher ΔE value (13.6 ± 4.2) was detected (P = 0.032). CONCLUSION: Materials used in endodontics may stain teeth. Therefore, the choice of material should not rely solely on biological and functional criteria, but also take aesthetic considerations into account.

Abstract

AIM: To investigate the discoloration potential of endodontic materials using a bovine tooth model. METHODOLOGY: Two hundred and 10 dentine-enamel cuboid blocks (10 × 10 × 3.5 mm) were prepared out of the middle thirds of bovine tooth crowns. Standardized cavities were prepared in the walls of the pulp chamber leaving 2 mm of enamel and dentine on the labial wall of the crown. The specimens were randomly assigned to 14 groups (n = 15). Endodontic materials were placed into the cavities as follows: group A: empty, group B: blood, group C: calcium hydroxide, group D: ApexCal, group E: Ultracal XS, group F: Ledermix, group G: triple antibiotic paste (3Mix), group H: grey MTA(GMTA), group I: GMTA + blood, group J: white MTA (WMTA), group K: WMTA + blood, group L: Portland cement (PC), group M: PC + blood and group N: AH Plus. The cavities were sealed with composite and stored in water. Standardized colour measurement (VITA Easyshade compact) was performed at the following intervals: prior to (T0) and after placement of the filling (T1), 1 week (T2), 1 month (T3), 3 months (T4), 6 months (T5) and after 1 year (T6). Colour change (ΔE) values were calculated. A two-way analysis of variance was used to assess significant differences between the endodontic materials. The mean values of all groups were compared using the Tukey multiple comparison test (α = 0.05). RESULTS: Significant differences were detected amongst the experimental groups after 12 months (P < 0.0001). The lowest colour change values were observed in the groups N (AH Plus, 3.2 ± 1.5), A (empty, 3.8 ± 1.4), L (PC, 4.1 ± 1.7), C (calcium hydroxide, 4.7 ± 1.5), E (Ultracal XS, 5.1 ± 1.9) and J (WMTA, 7.9 ± 6.7). The most discoloration was measured in groups G (3Mix, 66.2 ± 9.9) and F (Ledermix, 46.2 ± 11.6). PC showed the best colour stability amongst the Portland cement-based materials; however, when contaminated with blood (group M), a significantly higher ΔE value (13.6 ± 4.2) was detected (P = 0.032). CONCLUSION: Materials used in endodontics may stain teeth. Therefore, the choice of material should not rely solely on biological and functional criteria, but also take aesthetic considerations into account.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Preventive Dentistry, Periodontology and Cariology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:06 Dec 2012 14:03
Last Modified:17 Feb 2018 00:12
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0143-2885
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2591.2012.02053.x
PubMed ID:22506849

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