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Exploring geomorphometry through user generated content: comparing an unsupervised geomorphometric classification with terms attached to georeferenced images in Great Britain


Gschwend, Christian; Purves, Ross S (2012). Exploring geomorphometry through user generated content: comparing an unsupervised geomorphometric classification with terms attached to georeferenced images in Great Britain. Transactions in GIS, 16(4):499-522.

Abstract

User generated content such as the georeferenced images and their associated tags found in Flickr provides us with opportunities to explore how the world is described in the non-scientific, everyday language used by contributors. Geomorphometry, the quantitative study of landforms, provides methods to classify Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) according to attributes such as slope and convexity. In this article we compare the terms used in Flickr and Geograph in Great Britian to describe georeferenced images to a quantitative, unsupervised classification of a DEM, using a well established method, and explore the variation of terms across geomorphometric classes and space. Anthropogenic terms are primarily associated with more gentle slopes, while terms which refer to objects such as mountains and waterfalls are typical of steeper slopes. Terms vary both across and within classes, and the source of the user generated content has an influence on the type of term used with Geograph, a collection which aims to document the geography of Great Britain, dominated by features which might be observed on a map.

Abstract

User generated content such as the georeferenced images and their associated tags found in Flickr provides us with opportunities to explore how the world is described in the non-scientific, everyday language used by contributors. Geomorphometry, the quantitative study of landforms, provides methods to classify Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) according to attributes such as slope and convexity. In this article we compare the terms used in Flickr and Geograph in Great Britian to describe georeferenced images to a quantitative, unsupervised classification of a DEM, using a well established method, and explore the variation of terms across geomorphometric classes and space. Anthropogenic terms are primarily associated with more gentle slopes, while terms which refer to objects such as mountains and waterfalls are typical of steeper slopes. Terms vary both across and within classes, and the source of the user generated content has an influence on the type of term used with Geograph, a collection which aims to document the geography of Great Britain, dominated by features which might be observed on a map.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:30 Nov 2012 14:35
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:08
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
Series Name:Transactions in GIS
ISSN:1361-1682
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9671.2012.01307.x

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