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Multidrug-resistant bacteria in travellers hospitalized abroad: prevalence, characteristics, and influence on clinical outcome


Nemeth, J; Ledergerber, B; Preiswerk, B; Nobile, A; Karrer, S; Ruef, C; Kuster, S P (2012). Multidrug-resistant bacteria in travellers hospitalized abroad: prevalence, characteristics, and influence on clinical outcome. Journal of Hospital Infection, 82(4):254-259.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Worldwide, the burden of multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDR) is increasing, especially in the hospital setting.
AIM: To explore characteristics and clinical relevance of MDR obtained from travellers transferred from hospitals abroad.
METHODS: This retrospective study included patients transferred from hospitals abroad to the University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland, who routinely underwent admission screening for possible colonization with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria (ESBL) and multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MR Gram negative).
FINDINGS: Forty-six (17%) of 259 subjects were found to be colonized with MDR and nine (3.5%) patients to be infected. Thirty-three (12%) patients were colonized with one bacterial species, 12 (4.6%) with two, and three (1.2%) were colonized with three different bacterial species. In total, 36 ESBL, 21 MR Gram-negative and three MRSA isolates were detected. Escherichia coli (N = 18, 30%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (N = 14, 23%) and Acinetobacter baumannii (N = 14, 23%) were most frequently isolated. The most common sites of detection were skin (97%) and respiratory tract (41%). Being colonized contributed to an increased length of ICU stay [median (range): 8 (1-35) vs 3.5 (1-78) days; P = 0.011]. In-hospital mortality in patients colonized with MDR (10.9%) was higher than in uncolonized patients (2.3%, P = 0.018). Being colonized with MDR was associated with death (adjusted odds ratio: 5.176; 95% confidence interval: 1.325-20.218).
CONCLUSIONS: A substantial proportion of patients transferred from abroad are colonized with MDR, a fact which is associated with poor clinical outcome.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Worldwide, the burden of multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDR) is increasing, especially in the hospital setting.
AIM: To explore characteristics and clinical relevance of MDR obtained from travellers transferred from hospitals abroad.
METHODS: This retrospective study included patients transferred from hospitals abroad to the University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland, who routinely underwent admission screening for possible colonization with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria (ESBL) and multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MR Gram negative).
FINDINGS: Forty-six (17%) of 259 subjects were found to be colonized with MDR and nine (3.5%) patients to be infected. Thirty-three (12%) patients were colonized with one bacterial species, 12 (4.6%) with two, and three (1.2%) were colonized with three different bacterial species. In total, 36 ESBL, 21 MR Gram-negative and three MRSA isolates were detected. Escherichia coli (N = 18, 30%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (N = 14, 23%) and Acinetobacter baumannii (N = 14, 23%) were most frequently isolated. The most common sites of detection were skin (97%) and respiratory tract (41%). Being colonized contributed to an increased length of ICU stay [median (range): 8 (1-35) vs 3.5 (1-78) days; P = 0.011]. In-hospital mortality in patients colonized with MDR (10.9%) was higher than in uncolonized patients (2.3%, P = 0.018). Being colonized with MDR was associated with death (adjusted odds ratio: 5.176; 95% confidence interval: 1.325-20.218).
CONCLUSIONS: A substantial proportion of patients transferred from abroad are colonized with MDR, a fact which is associated with poor clinical outcome.

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13 citations in Web of Science®
15 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:14 Dec 2012 15:19
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:08
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0195-6701
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2012.08.017
PubMed ID:23103249

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