Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Numerical modeling of the Mount Steller landslide flow history and of the generated long period seismic waves


Moretti, L; Mangeney, A; Capdeville, Y; Stutzmann, E; Huggel, C; Schneider, D; Bouchut, F (2012). Numerical modeling of the Mount Steller landslide flow history and of the generated long period seismic waves. Geophysical Research Letters, 39:L16402.

Abstract

The rock-ice avalanche that occurred in 2005 on Mount Steller, Alaska and the resulting long period seismic waves have been simulated for different avalanche scenarios (i.e., flow histories), with and without erosion processes taken into account. This 40–60 Mm3 avalanche traveled about 10 km down the slope, mainly on top of a glacier, eroding a significant amount of ice. It was recorded by 7 broadband seismic stations. The simulations were compared with the recorded long period seismic signal and with the inverted flow history. The results show that, when erosion processes are taken into account, the simulations reproduce the observed signal at all the stations over a wide range of azi- muths and source-station distances (37–623 km). This comparison makes it possible to constrain the rheological parameters involved which should help constrain the volume of eroded material. Because landslides are continuously recorded by seismic networks, this method could signifi- cantly broaden quantitative insights into natural flow dynamics. Citation: Moretti, L., A. Mangeney, Y. Capdeville, E. Stutzmann, C. Huggel, D. Schneider, and F. Bouchut (2012), Numerical modeling of the Mount Steller landslide flow history and of the generated long period seismic waves.

Abstract

The rock-ice avalanche that occurred in 2005 on Mount Steller, Alaska and the resulting long period seismic waves have been simulated for different avalanche scenarios (i.e., flow histories), with and without erosion processes taken into account. This 40–60 Mm3 avalanche traveled about 10 km down the slope, mainly on top of a glacier, eroding a significant amount of ice. It was recorded by 7 broadband seismic stations. The simulations were compared with the recorded long period seismic signal and with the inverted flow history. The results show that, when erosion processes are taken into account, the simulations reproduce the observed signal at all the stations over a wide range of azi- muths and source-station distances (37–623 km). This comparison makes it possible to constrain the rheological parameters involved which should help constrain the volume of eroded material. Because landslides are continuously recorded by seismic networks, this method could signifi- cantly broaden quantitative insights into natural flow dynamics. Citation: Moretti, L., A. Mangeney, Y. Capdeville, E. Stutzmann, C. Huggel, D. Schneider, and F. Bouchut (2012), Numerical modeling of the Mount Steller landslide flow history and of the generated long period seismic waves.

Statistics

Citations

41 citations in Web of Science®
43 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

90 downloads since deposited on 28 Dec 2012
28 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:28 Dec 2012 10:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:11
Publisher:American Geophysical Union
Series Name:Geophysical Research Letters
ISSN:0094-8276
Additional Information:Copyright 2012 American Geophysical Union
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1029/2012GL052511

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 3MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations